1. gwendyg2003 said: Fav books - Gilead - Marilynne Robinson, March - Geraldine Brooks, The Absolutely,True Diary of a part time Indian - Sherman Alexie, The round House - Louise Erdich, The Invention of Wings, Sue Monk Kidd, Feast of Fools - James Lee Burke, The Liars Club - Mary Karr, Chains - Laurie Halse Anderson, Jane Eyre, for me its about the writing, the voice and the feeling. and some kind of authenticity

    This week’s readers advisory request comes to us as a list of books. The reader says that for her, a good book is language driven and the voice should ring through as authentic. Do we have any authentic voices for this reader?

    Looking for a recommendation? Ask us.

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    I love Paddy Clarke, Ha-ha-ha by Roddy Doyle.  It won the Booker Prize in 1993. The book is written in the voice of a 10-year-old Irish boy. It is positively brilliant. The reader mentions liking Sherman Alexie, so this could be a nice fit. —Maura Muller, Volunteers Office

    The two books that come to immediately to mind for me are both memoirs: Patti Smith’s beautiful memoir about her friendship with Robert Mapplethorpe, Just Kids and Jim Carroll’s The Basketball Diaries. —Lynn Lobash, Readers Services

    I see a lot of my favorites on this reader’s list!  I’d recommend: Olive Kitteridge by Elizabeth Strout, short stories tied together by the memorable character of Oliver Kitteridge. These Is My Words by Nancy E. Turner, an historical fiction about a frontier woman’s journey. The Age of Miracles by Karen Thompson Walker, super sad and haunting but lovely dystopic fiction. The Paris Wife by Paula McLain, based on the life of Ernest Hemingway’s first wife Hadley. I also think My Life in France by Julia Child and Little Heathens by Mildred Armstrong Kalish, both memoirs, might click for this reader.  —Susan Tucker Heimbach, Mulberry Street

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  2. Writing  can be a daunting task: the blank page staring back at you, the search for inspiration. Over the years, NYPL has spoken to dozens of notable authors who have faced this challenge and created something extraordinary. On National Day on Writing, we’ve collected the best bits of writing advice from our most beloved guests, including Zadie Smith, Toni Morrison, and Cheryl Strayed. 

    Writing  can be a daunting task: the blank page staring back at you, the search for inspiration. Over the years, NYPL has spoken to dozens of notable authors who have faced this challenge and created something extraordinary. On National Day on Writing, we’ve collected the best bits of writing advice from our most beloved guests, including Zadie Smith, Toni Morrison, and Cheryl Strayed. 

  3. Recently, we published a list of the most outstanding teachers in adult fiction, but now it’s time to turn the spotlight on teachers in children’s literature! We asked NYPL librarians to share the children’s books with the best teacher characters and to tell us what makes them extraordinary.

    Recently, we published a list of the most outstanding teachers in adult fiction, but now it’s time to turn the spotlight on teachers in children’s literature! We asked NYPL librarians to share the children’s books with the best teacher characters and to tell us what makes them extraordinary.

  4. Anonymous said: The Secret History, Jonathan Strange and Mr. Norrell, Murakami,

    This week’s readers advisory request comes to us in the form of two books and an author our reader has enjoyed in the past: The Secret HistoryJonathan Strange and Mr. Norrell, and Haruki Murakami

    Here is what our staff recommended for this reader. If you want a reading recommendation from the NYPL, ask us on Tumblr.

    The Crying of Lot 49 Cover

    I might say the reader likes language and story, with character-based interest too, and with some psychological suspense or even unreliability in the mix. Or, just, generally meaty books that grab you with inner ruminating intrigue. I’d recommend trying The Crying of Lot 49 by Thomas Pynchon for some intrigue and a picture of someone confronting questions of hidden reality from a big-name writer. I’d also recommend The Book of Laughter and Forgetting by Milan Kundera, for language, fantastical yet deep, pondering, and relatable examinations of reality, and characterizations. —Jill Rothstein, Andrew Heiskell Library

    I’m guessing this reader likes college settings with lots of intrigue and suspense, in addition to character building and language style. I think some of the other well-known authors of Japanese literature might fit the bill, or titles set at universities, especially novels with gothic or mysterious overtones, and bildungsroman. Try Ryu Murakami’s Almost Transparent Blue and 69, Kenzaburo Oe’s The Changeling, Banana Yoshimoto’s The Lake,Campus novels and more campus novels—Jenny Baum, Jefferson Market

    Read more here

     

  5. On this day in 1926, Winnie-the-Pooh was published. Winnie, Tigger, Eeyore, and the rest of his friends from the Hundred Acre Wood now live at NYPL where they are cared for and loved! Learn more about how we keep Winnie and his friends looking their finest. 

    On this day in 1926, Winnie-the-Pooh was published. Winnie, Tigger, Eeyore, and the rest of his friends from the Hundred Acre Wood now live at NYPL where they are cared for and loved! Learn more about how we keep Winnie and his friends looking their finest. 

  6. NYPL is building a team of talented, committed and enthusiastic volunteer educators to help mentor middle schoolers across three boroughs – and we want you to join us. Become a mentor and help enrich the life of a NYC student today! 

    NYPL is building a team of talented, committed and enthusiastic volunteer educators to help mentor middle schoolers across three boroughs – and we want you to join us. Become a mentor and help enrich the life of a NYC student today! 

  7. October is the perfect time to scare yourself silly! We asked NYPL staffers to recommend their favorite spooky reads filled with ghosts, vampires, and haunted houses. What was the last book that gave you goosebumps? 

    October is the perfect time to scare yourself silly! We asked NYPL staffers to recommend their favorite spooky reads filled with ghosts, vampires, and haunted houses. What was the last book that gave you goosebumps? 

  8. Artist Peter Bynum shows paint at its most active, a complex nervous system that doesn’t feel or think, but most definitely reacts.

    Hear more about this extraordinary new style of painting when Bynum visits the Library tomorrow to discuss his exhibition Illuminated Paint at the Mid-Manhattan Library and the “interconnectedness of all life” and art with art librarian Arezoo Mohseni.

  9. mecmikvarkhar said: my favorite book is lord of the rings, song of ice and fire, american gods

    If you liked Lord of the Rings, Game of Thrones, and American Gods….here are some titles to consider from the NYPL.

    Looking for something to read? Ask us.

    Perdido Street Station

    Perdido Street Station by China Miéville

    Perdido Street Station is the first book set in China Miéville’s fictional world of Bas-Lag and melds urban fantasy with steampunk-tinged science fiction.

    It parallels the expansive world building of Tolkien’s Middle-earth and Martin’s Westeros and Essos and, in another interesting connection, Perdido Street Station was nominated for the 2002 Hugo and Nebula awards for Best Novel, both of which went to Gaiman’s American Gods.

    - Thomas Knowlton, Muhlenberg Library

    Here’s a non-fantasy pick for GoT readers:

    If you savored the intrigue, plotting, and parricide involved in the ruthless quest for power in A Song of Ice and Fire, its epic battles and detailed world building, you may enjoy Robert Graves’s Claudius the God. Graves recreates ancient Rome with the same care that GRRM uses in creating the fictional Westeros, and I defy even the Lannisters or Littlefinger to best Livia and some of her Claudian descendants in any game of thrones. While there are no dragons in the Claudius novels, Graves does recount how elephants were used to great effect in the Roman conquest of Britain in 43 A.D. 

    - Elizabeth Waters, Mid-Manhattan Library

    Brandon Sanderson’s Mistborn series

    This is detailed epic high fantasy with an ensemble cast of characters and a battle that will ultimately decide the fate of the world. It includes it’s own unique system of magic and powers and strong amount of world building.

    - Stephanie Whelan, Seward Park Library

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  10. For today’s teenagers, bullying can be a persistent problem encountered daily. For National Bullying Prevention month, we’re sharing some books from our young adult fiction shelves on this subject to help empower readers and show they’re not alone.

    For today’s teenagers, bullying can be a persistent problem encountered daily. For National Bullying Prevention month, we’re sharing some books from our young adult fiction shelves on this subject to help empower readers and show they’re not alone.