1. It’s finally spring in New York, so we’re diving into some of the nature-inspired design books in the Wallach Division’s Art and Architecture Collection to celebrate the intermittent sunshine. E. A. Séguy (1889–1985) was a master of the Art Deco pochoir technique, a labor-intensive hand-coloring process involving the use of stencil plates and thick, vivid washes of watercolor gouache. Art Deco artists employed both geometric abstraction and natural forms to develop vibrant and undulating patterns, as exemplified by the initial animal studies and final decorative motifs in Séguy’s Butterflies.

    It’s finally spring in New York, so we’re diving into some of the nature-inspired design books in the Wallach Division’s Art and Architecture Collection to celebrate the intermittent sunshine. E. A. Séguy (1889–1985) was a master of the Art Deco pochoir technique, a labor-intensive hand-coloring process involving the use of stencil plates and thick, vivid washes of watercolor gouache. Art Deco artists employed both geometric abstraction and natural forms to develop vibrant and undulating patterns, as exemplified by the initial animal studies and final decorative motifs in Séguy’s Butterflies.

  2. It’s a beautiful day in the neighborhood! Today the Washington Heights Library celebrated it’s grand reopening and centennial! The building turned 100 on February 26th and received a beautiful renovation. There’s a full-day’s worth of activities happening today, so don’t take our word for it - stop by and visit it yourself! 

    It’s a beautiful day in the neighborhood! Today the Washington Heights Library celebrated it’s grand reopening and centennial! The building turned 100 on February 26th and received a beautiful renovation. There’s a full-day’s worth of activities happening today, so don’t take our word for it - stop by and visit it yourself! 

  3. percentforartnyc:

    For two days every year, Open House New York (OHNY) Weekend gives the public a chance to engage more deeply with the built environment and learn more about aspects our city that are often hidden in plain sight. This year Percent for Art commissions in two boroughs will be featured in the weekend’s activities on October 12 &13, located in New York Public Library’s Bronx Library Center, and Queens Public Library’s branches in Long Island City and Flushing. The pieces, pictured above, range from architectural elements like Yong Soon Min’s etched glass wall to interior features like Iñigo Manglano Ovalle’s exploration of DNA as a catalog, reflecting the diverse ways permanent art can enhance our public spaces.

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  4. This rare construction photo - taken exactly 102 years ago today - shows the foundations of the famous Woolworth Building, one of the country’s oldest skyscrapers. The photo was taken at Broadway and Park Place in Manhattan by photographer Irving Underhill on Oct. 6, 1911, and is currently part of our Irma and Paul Milstein Division of United States History, Local History and Genealogy, The Woolworth Building - designed by famed architect Cass Gilbert - was completed two years later in 1913. 

    This rare construction photo - taken exactly 102 years ago today - shows the foundations of the famous Woolworth Building, one of the country’s oldest skyscrapers. The photo was taken at Broadway and Park Place in Manhattan by photographer Irving Underhill on Oct. 6, 1911, and is currently part of our Irma and Paul Milstein Division of United States History, Local History and Genealogy, The Woolworth Building - designed by famed architect Cass Gilbert - was completed two years later in 1913. 

  5. Happy Birthday Antoni Gaudí! Today is the 161st birthday of the modern architect. Born in Catalonia, Spain, Gaudí designed many buildings including Casa Balló and Park Güell. In 1926 Gaudí was struck and killed by a tram in Barcelona, never having seen the finished work of his iconic church, the Sagrada Familia. To learn more about Gaudí and his designs, visit your local NYPL branch!

    Happy Birthday Antoni Gaudí! Today is the 161st birthday of the modern architect. Born in Catalonia, Spain, Gaudí designed many buildings including Casa Balló and Park Güell. In 1926 Gaudí was struck and killed by a tram in Barcelona, never having seen the finished work of his iconic church, the Sagrada Familia. To learn more about Gaudí and his designs, visit your local NYPL branch!

  6. Happy Summer! Tomorrow looks to be a beautiful day. The perfect day to visit your local library. (Of course we think every day is a perfect day to visit your local library!) But tomorrow we have some lovely things planned:

    Harlem friends, it’s time to get your knit and perl on. Join Harlem’s Knitting Circle tomorrow at the Harlem Library! But, BYOY (Bring your own yarn). Or you could stop by Harbor Day on 104th Street between Madison and 5th Aves. Boys & Girls Harbor are hosting  a day of free outdoor activities, giveaways, community resources, and refreshments - and NYPL will be there too!

    For our library lovers in the Bronx, Spuyten Duyvil Library will be showing the movie Les Miserables. Yes, the one with Hugh Jackman! 

    And for those of you on the lovely Isle of Staten, New Dorp Library will be hosting a meditation workshop, which will help clear your mind and help you enjoy the day even more!

    Of course, if you haven’t already done so - you should visit Mid-Manhattan Library to see their exhibition Reading Room, which showcases all 87 of NYPL’s local libraries! But, n
    o matter which branch you visit, don’t forget to sign your letter opposing the $47 million budget cut! 

  7. Ever wonder about the origin of your public library’s name? Today - with the help of Elizabeth Felicella’s photographs from her exhibition Reading Room - we’re introducing you to Francis MartinGeorge Bruce and Hamilton Fish. All three (and quite a few others) have local library branches named in honor of their achievements in New York City. 

    Francis Martin Library was eponymously named after the distinguished Bronx judge, who served as the first District Attorney of Bronx County. 

    George Bruce Library was established by the daughter of George Bruce,  an enterprising young Scotsman who sailed to the United States before he was 15 and became a well-known typefounder and inventor of printing machinery in New York. 

    Hamilton Fish Library is named in honor of the distinguished American statesman who was Governor of New York and Secretary of State under Ulysses S. Grant.

    You can visit these three branches (or any branch in NYC) and speak out against the proposed City budget cut.  We think their namesakes would be proud of your support!

  8. Bookshelves. They come in all shapes and sizes, but no matter what kind of bookshelf you have it’s a beauty! It can hold so much information about exactly the topics you’re interested in reading about. Check out these glorious bookshelves at Ottendorfer, Macomb’s Bridge, Port Richmond and Tottenville libraries from Reading Room, Mid-Manhattan Library’s photography exhibition featuring NYPL’s local branches.  

    Support your local library today!

  9. Pictured here (courtesy of Mid-Manhattan Library’s exhibition Reading Room, natch), a few lovely examples of children’s areas at our local libraries. From left to right, top to bottom: Highbridge, Riverside, Throg’s Neck and West Farms libraries. 

    And did you know that children can show their support of the library and oppose the budget cuts just as well as their folks? The Library has letters they can sign. These are their libraries too, after all!

  10. When a door closes, open a window! At any of the Library’s 87 branch locations - such as Tompkins Square, St. Agnes, or Countee Cullen libraries (shown here respectively) - we can help open that window! But, we need your help too! The city is proposing a $47 million budget cut for NYPL and we need you to visit your local branch or stop by our website to tell the City how much you love your library! 

    These beautiful images of some of the Library’s windows are courtesy of Elizabeth Felicella, who currently has an exhibition at Mid-Manhattan Library.