1. We are deeply saddened to hear of the loss of Emmy and Tony Award winning actress Elaine Stritch, whose acerbic personality and memorable stage and screen performances have captured hearts for decades. This 1954 promotional photo from our Billy Rose Theatre Division features Stritch as Peggy Porterfield in a revival of “On Your Toes,” and captures her personalty perfectly. Learn more about the American Theater Hall of Famer by checking out materials from your local NYPL branch.  

    We are deeply saddened to hear of the loss of Emmy and Tony Award winning actress Elaine Stritch, whose acerbic personality and memorable stage and screen performances have captured hearts for decades. This 1954 promotional photo from our Billy Rose Theatre Division features Stritch as Peggy Porterfield in a revival of “On Your Toes,” and captures her personalty perfectly. Learn more about the American Theater Hall of Famer by checking out materials from your local NYPL branch.  

  2. On this day in 1840, Samuel Morse received the patent for his telegraph machine. (the ancestor to your iPhone) This photo from NYPL’s Wallach Photography Division shows the original instrument that sent the first ever telegraph message 4 years later from the Washington end of the Washington-Baltimore telegraph line. 
The More You Know… Happy Friday!

    On this day in 1840, Samuel Morse received the patent for his telegraph machine. (the ancestor to your iPhone) This photo from NYPL’s Wallach Photography Division shows the original instrument that sent the first ever telegraph message 4 years later from the Washington end of the Washington-Baltimore telegraph line. 

    The More You Know… Happy Friday!

  3. Little girls in floral dresses and a young boy in knickers and a pair of chucks = early mid-20th century New York City. Harlem to be precise and the George Bruce Library to be exact. They’re looking at the window display “Your Public Library,” which was a popular display at the branch and at times featured Americana (like the one above), ships, art from different cultures, Democracy, and other topics. Take a stroll down our memory lane - otherwise known as the Digital Collections - and learn more about NYPL’s historic branches.
And if you love George Bruce Library or one of our other lovely locations, be sure to sign NYPL’s petition and tell City leaders we need more Library funding!

    Little girls in floral dresses and a young boy in knickers and a pair of chucks = early mid-20th century New York City. Harlem to be precise and the George Bruce Library to be exact. They’re looking at the window display “Your Public Library,” which was a popular display at the branch and at times featured Americana (like the one above), ships, art from different cultures, Democracy, and other topics. Take a stroll down our memory lane - otherwise known as the Digital Collections - and learn more about NYPL’s historic branches.

    And if you love George Bruce Library or one of our other lovely locations, be sure to sign NYPL’s petition and tell City leaders we need more Library funding!

  4. Happy Caturday from The New York Public Library’s Library for the Performing Arts! In this rare 1964 Martha Swope photo from the Jerome Robbins Dance Division (unearthed by our own Jeremy Megraw), internationally-renowned choreographer George Balanchine (known by many as the father of modern American ballet) watches in flip flops as his cat Mourka flies through the air with the greatest of ease (the cat became famous - this photo was once in Life magazine, and a book was written about him and his ability to do acrobatic dance moves).  It’s good to know that even a legend like Balanchine gave his cat that familiar, bewildered “What in the name of all that is good are you doing” look. Happy Caturday! And, while you’re thinking of it, flip through more amazing, rare photos from our collections here - there are plenty of other cat images. 

    Happy Caturday from The New York Public Library’s Library for the Performing Arts! In this rare 1964 Martha Swope photo from the Jerome Robbins Dance Division (unearthed by our own Jeremy Megraw), internationally-renowned choreographer George Balanchine (known by many as the father of modern American ballet) watches in flip flops as his cat Mourka flies through the air with the greatest of ease (the cat became famous - this photo was once in Life magazine, and a book was written about him and his ability to do acrobatic dance moves).  It’s good to know that even a legend like Balanchine gave his cat that familiar, bewildered “What in the name of all that is good are you doing” look. Happy Caturday! And, while you’re thinking of it, flip through more amazing, rare photos from our collections here - there are plenty of other cat images. 

  5. In honor of the newly-arrived Spring, and our fervent hope for warmer weather, today’s Caturday from NYPL’s 1939 World’s Fair Collection features a magnolia blossom and two extraordinarily tiny kittens.

    In honor of the newly-arrived Spring, and our fervent hope for warmer weather, today’s Caturday from NYPL’s 1939 World’s Fair Collection features a magnolia blossom and two extraordinarily tiny kittens.

  6. On this day in 1909 William H. Taft was inaugurated as the 27th President of the United States. To commemorate the occasion we selected this photograph from NYPL’s Photography Collection of President Taft with his presidential predecessor Theodore Roosevelt, who are both sporting some  magnificent mustaches! 

    On this day in 1909 William H. Taft was inaugurated as the 27th President of the United States. To commemorate the occasion we selected this photograph from NYPL’s Photography Collection of President Taft with his presidential predecessor Theodore Roosevelt, who are both sporting some  magnificent mustaches! 

  7. Absurd Vintage Skating Photos Even Non-Sports Fans Will Love →

  8. America’s first President certainly left his mark on the future of our country and if the legend is true, he also left his mark for all to see at the majestic Natural Bridge in Virginia. This photograph from NYPL’s  Pageant of America series captures the moment in stark black and white. We find it pretty inspirational! We wouldn’t go so far as to say that folks should carve their initials in the beauty of nature, but it does make us consider how to leave our mark in other ways. 

    America’s first President certainly left his mark on the future of our country and if the legend is true, he also left his mark for all to see at the majestic Natural Bridge in Virginia. This photograph from NYPL’s  Pageant of America series captures the moment in stark black and white. We find it pretty inspirational! We wouldn’t go so far as to say that folks should carve their initials in the beauty of nature, but it does make us consider how to leave our mark in other ways. 

  9. Today we bid farewell to comic genius Sid Caesar. Above is a photo from LPA’s Billy Rose Theater Collection, which shows the television pioneer mid-sketch with his fabled partner in comedic crime - Imogene Coca. 
We enjoyed the show Mr. Caesar and we thank you for the lifetime of laughs you bestowed on us. 
If you would like to learn more about the imitable Sid Caesar, the Library has books, movies and cds featuring the legendary comedian.

    Today we bid farewell to comic genius Sid Caesar. Above is a photo from LPA’s Billy Rose Theater Collection, which shows the television pioneer mid-sketch with his fabled partner in comedic crime - Imogene Coca. 

    We enjoyed the show Mr. Caesar and we thank you for the lifetime of laughs you bestowed on us. 

    If you would like to learn more about the imitable Sid Caesar, the Library has books, movies and cds featuring the legendary comedian.

  10. Fumble! There was some fumbling going on last night. Now, we have love for both the Seahawks and the Broncos - the only reason we state the obvious is to share this awesome vintage photograph from NYPL’s Photograph Collection. 

    Fumble! There was some fumbling going on last night. Now, we have love for both the Seahawks and the Broncos - the only reason we state the obvious is to share this awesome vintage photograph from NYPL’s Photograph Collection.