1. Congrats to the great books that have been awarded the Caldecott (This Is Not My Hat), Newbery, (The One and Only Ivan) and Coretta Scott King Book (I, Too, Am America) awards (among others!) this year! 

    A number of the celebrated books—such as Coretta Scott King illustrator Award Honoree H.O.R.S.Eand Newbery Honoree Splendors and Glooms are featured in the NYPL’s 100 Books for Reading and Sharing 2012. Be sure to check them out today!

    ((Updated to include even more wonderful award winners and honorees))

  2. "Do you know Cat’s In The Cradle? What’s New Pussycat? How about Freebird? We just looove birds. Freebird!" 
Two cute kitties are enjoying a lute concert in this 1912 print of an illustration by legendary artist Randolph Caldecott, the namesake of the Caldecott Medal. The print is in the Library’s Mid-Manhattan Picture Collection, and is from the picture book “Elegy On The Death Of A Mad Dog.” The kid in the middle is a little creepy, but whatever.
Happy Caturday!

    "Do you know Cat’s In The Cradle? What’s New Pussycat? How about Freebird? We just looove birds. Freebird!" 

    Two cute kitties are enjoying a lute concert in this 1912 print of an illustration by legendary artist Randolph Caldecott, the namesake of the Caldecott Medal. The print is in the Library’s Mid-Manhattan Picture Collection, and is from the picture book “Elegy On The Death Of A Mad Dog.” The kid in the middle is a little creepy, but whatever.

    Happy Caturday!

  3. 10 Caldecott Award Winners That Have Stood the Test of Time

     A Ball for Daisy, written and illustrated by Chris Raschka, just won the 2012 Caldecott Medal! Youth Materials Specialist Betsy Bird shares her picks for 10 winners that have stood the test of time.

    1942: Make Way for Ducklings by Robert McCloskey (Viking)
    These ducklings don’t age (and how great is it that one of them was named Ouack?).

    1943: The Little House by Virginia Lee Burton (Houghton)
    A story where urbanization intrudes on the surrounding countryside? 1943 is starting to feel a whole heck of a lot like 2012.

    1954: Madeline’s Rescue by Ludwig Bemelmans (Viking)
    Saucy without being snarky, headstrong but never bratty, this is the ultimate Can We Get a Dog? story.

    1957: A Tree Is Nice, illustrated by Marc Simont; text: Janice Udry (Harper)
    Trees make for good subject matter, particularly these days when we need them more than ever.

    1964: Where the Wild Things Are by Maurice Sendak (Harper)
    The best picture book ever written in the English language for children? You decide.

    1968: Drummer Hoff, illustrated by Ed Emberley; text: adapted by Barbara Emberley (Prentice-Hall)
    Written at the height of the Vietnam War, this rhyme makes a subtle statement about armed conflicts.

    1976: Why Mosquitoes Buzz in People’s Ears, illustrated by Leo & Diane Dillon; text: retold by Verna Aardema (Dial)
    This enjoyable folktale’s language is matched only by its stunning visuals.

    1982: Jumanji by Chris Van Allsburg (Houghton)
    Like an episode of The Twilight Zone for kids, you’ll never look at your board games the same way again.

    1990: Lon Po Po: A Red-Riding Hood Story from China by Ed Young (Philomel)
    Little Red Riding Hood gets a whole new twist in this retelling. See if you can spot the wolf hiding in the illustrations.

    2000: Joseph Had a Little Overcoat by Simms Taback (Viking)
    Mr. Taback left us just this past Christmas but his fabulous die-cut extravaganza lives on in hearts and minds.