1. Yesterday - just in time for Halloween - the NYPL launched in conjunction with the University of Maryland and Oxford’s Bodleian Library the brand new Shelley-Godwin Archive online. As The New York Times wrote yesterday, users can now examine online the various literary manuscripts of “the first family of English literature” which includes Percy Bysshe Shelley, Mary Wollstonecraft, William Godwin and of course Mary Shelley. The manuscripts will be released in four phases but you Frankenstein buffs can already get a chance to look at the original manuscript of that iconic work. 

    Yesterday - just in time for Halloween - the NYPL launched in conjunction with the University of Maryland and Oxford’s Bodleian Library the brand new Shelley-Godwin Archive online. As The New York Times wrote yesterday, users can now examine online the various literary manuscripts of “the first family of English literature” which includes Percy Bysshe Shelley, Mary Wollstonecraft, William Godwin and of course Mary Shelley. The manuscripts will be released in four phases but you Frankenstein buffs can already get a chance to look at the original manuscript of that iconic work. 

  2. The Library’s new app for iPad, Frankenstein: The Afterlife of Shelley’s Circle, asks users to engage in the central themes of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein in new ways. One feature allows readers to respond to questions that relate to the source material, engaging in a dialogue about everything from what books inspired them as children to ethics in science. 
Here’s how Lance Bohy, an IT Architect from Seattle answered a question about technology:
Q: People today are perhaps more likely to read the novel Frankenstein as an e-book, which is somewhat ironic given that a major theme of the novel is technology run amok. As the monster comes to life, Victor Frankenstein says: “I had worked hard for nearly two years, for the sole purpose of infusing life into an inanimate body. … But now that I had finished, the beauty of the dream vanished, and breathless horror and disgust filled my heart.” Can we see e-books, now in their infancy, leading to the fulfillment of a dream — or starting down a path that leads to ultimate horror, the dream turned nightmare?
A: A dream turned nightmare? Nonsense. This work that I now hold in my hands bears evidence to just how good we have it. With this device half as thick as my finger I have book, history lesson, master class, art gallery and more all within just this one app alone. This is the stuff of dreams! This is not simply Gutenberg-redux, this is more. Much more. NYPL’s Biblion is a shining example of what is possible and coolest part: we’ve just begun! I can’t wait to see where we go from here.
Now it’s your turn: fire up your iPad, download Frankenstein, and tell us what you think.

    The Library’s new app for iPad, Frankenstein: The Afterlife of Shelley’s Circle, asks users to engage in the central themes of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein in new ways. One feature allows readers to respond to questions that relate to the source material, engaging in a dialogue about everything from what books inspired them as children to ethics in science. 

    Here’s how Lance Bohy, an IT Architect from Seattle answered a question about technology:

    Q: People today are perhaps more likely to read the novel Frankenstein as an e-book, which is somewhat ironic given that a major theme of the novel is technology run amok. As the monster comes to life, Victor Frankenstein says: “I had worked hard for nearly two years, for the sole purpose of infusing life into an inanimate body. … But now that I had finished, the beauty of the dream vanished, and breathless horror and disgust filled my heart.” Can we see e-books, now in their infancy, leading to the fulfillment of a dream — or starting down a path that leads to ultimate horror, the dream turned nightmare?

    A: A dream turned nightmare? Nonsense. This work that I now hold in my hands bears evidence to just how good we have it. With this device half as thick as my finger I have book, history lesson, master class, art gallery and more all within just this one app alone. This is the stuff of dreams! This is not simply Gutenberg-redux, this is more. Much more. NYPL’s Biblion is a shining example of what is possible and coolest part: we’ve just begun! I can’t wait to see where we go from here.

    Now it’s your turn: fire up your iPad, download Frankenstein, and tell us what you think.

  3. explore-blog:

    The New York Public Library releases Biblion: Frankenstein for iPad, exploring rare collections of Mary Shelley materials that continue to inspire ideas and storytelling today – a sequel to NYPL’s Biblion: World’s Fair.

    In case you haven’t seen this yet! 

  4. Read Frankenstein like you’ve never read or explored it before in our new free iPad app, which is now ALIVE, er, live. Check out the web component or download the app here. The second edition of Biblion (which follows last year’s World’s Fair app, named one of Apple’s top education apps for iPad for 2011) is focused onFrankenstein and other works by the Shelleys and their circle. It features digitized original documents (such as the original Frankenstein manuscript, which you can compare to the version we all know now, a book of Percy Shelley’s poetry, and much, much more), original essays by students, staff, scholars and others on topics related toFrankenstein, and an Ask Biblion feature that allows users to answer questions and see answers from others. There’s a lot to explore, so download it and start!

    Read Frankenstein like you’ve never read or explored it before in our new free iPad app, which is now ALIVE, er, live. Check out the web component or download the app here. The second edition of Biblion (which follows last year’s World’s Fair app, named one of Apple’s top education apps for iPad for 2011) is focused onFrankenstein and other works by the Shelleys and their circle. It features digitized original documents (such as the original Frankenstein manuscript, which you can compare to the version we all know now, a book of Percy Shelley’s poetry, and much, much more), original essays by students, staff, scholars and others on topics related toFrankenstein, and an Ask Biblion feature that allows users to answer questions and see answers from others. There’s a lot to explore, so download it and start!

  5. Shelley’s Ghost: The Afterlife of a Poet opens today. Head over to the Stephen A. Schwarzman Building to check out Mary’s Shelley’s original draft of Frankenstein, Percy Bysshe Shelley’s baby rattle, and much more. Some of the artifacts and manuscripts have never been displayed in the United States before, so don’t miss this chance to see them!

    Shelley’s Ghost: The Afterlife of a Poet opens today. Head over to the Stephen A. Schwarzman Building to check out Mary’s Shelley’s original draft of Frankenstein, Percy Bysshe Shelley’s baby rattle, and much more. Some of the artifacts and manuscripts have never been displayed in the United States before, so don’t miss this chance to see them!

  6. What stories today do you think tap "hope and fear" at the same time—and do you think they will endure? →

    A little assignment for Frank-ophiles this weekend. (And by Frank-ophiles, we’re referring to Frankenstein, of course!) NYPL is in the midst of creating the latest Biblion app, in connection with our new exhibition opening February 24, Shelley’s Ghost: The Afterlife of a PoetWe need your help answering this question! Visit Hope and Fear: Frankenstein’s creation to share your thoughts!

  7. It’s alive! The NYPL has animated the first book Frankenstein author Mary Shelley ever worked on - a kid’s story called Mounseer Nongtongpaw, or the Discoveries of John Bull in a Trip to Paris. It was published by Shelley’s anarchist philosopher dad William Godwin in 1808 when she was a mere 10-years-old and is “probably the first book publication Mary Shelley was ever involved in,” said Charles Carter, a librarian from the Pforzheimer Collection, which houses the works of Percy Bysshe Shelley, his family and his friends. “She basically came up with a plot sketch for what was going to happen in the story. She had help from adults, but still, it’s very interesting.” In-house digital producer Jonathan Blanc put the video together in only a few weeks, Carter said, as a way to promote a new exhibit opening today called Shelley’s Ghost at Oxford University’s Bodleian Library. The show - a version of which will come to NYPL in 2012 - features 12 of the collection’s “greatest treasures,” said Carter, who wrote a blog post about it today. “I was trying to think of ways to promote it that would be adaptable to an electronic medium,” he said. “This particular item, because it’s so heavily illustrated, would lend itself well, I thought. I was thinking of a Reading Rainbow kind of thing.” Well done, and appropriate. The story was originally based on a comedic song from the early 1790s. Mary Shelley and company remixed it into the book. Since the book and its lavish artwork are part of the public domain, we were free to remix that and create our little animated adaptation. Some things never change.