1. Today is one of the most exciting and emotional days at NYPL, as 150 people from 46 different countries will become US citizens in front of our copy of the Declaration of Independence. Follow along as we live-blog the ceremony on Instagram

  2. Have you gone to see the NYPL’s copy of the Declaration of Independence yet? We’ve just added some extended hours for your viewing pleasure!

    Have you gone to see the NYPL’s copy of the Declaration of Independence yet? We’ve just added some extended hours for your viewing pleasure!

  3. Now through July 3, The New York Public Library is displaying a rare historic copy of the Declaration of Independence — written in Thomas Jefferson’s hand. Start your July 4 festivities early and visit our beautiful Bartos Forum, where you can see a piece of American history first-hand.

    Now through July 3, The New York Public Library is displaying a rare historic copy of the Declaration of Independence — written in Thomas Jefferson’s hand. Start your July 4 festivities early and visit our beautiful Bartos Forum, where you can see a piece of American history first-hand.

  4. On this day in 1840, Samuel Morse received the patent for his telegraph machine. (the ancestor to your iPhone) This photo from NYPL’s Wallach Photography Division shows the original instrument that sent the first ever telegraph message 4 years later from the Washington end of the Washington-Baltimore telegraph line. 
The More You Know… Happy Friday!

    On this day in 1840, Samuel Morse received the patent for his telegraph machine. (the ancestor to your iPhone) This photo from NYPL’s Wallach Photography Division shows the original instrument that sent the first ever telegraph message 4 years later from the Washington end of the Washington-Baltimore telegraph line. 

    The More You Know… Happy Friday!

  5. We thought this 1892 sheet music from our Library for the Performing Arts would make a nice Father’s Day Caturday installment. It would seem, based on the illustrations, that the composer’s daddy wouldn’t buy him a dog, or a “bow-wow.” Perhaps he brought home a kitty instead, as there are multiple cats on the cover. Oddly, though, the actual lyrics seem to indicate that this is somehow a fairly serious English political song. Well … whatever. Happy Father’s Day! And Happy Caturday!

    We thought this 1892 sheet music from our Library for the Performing Arts would make a nice Father’s Day Caturday installment. It would seem, based on the illustrations, that the composer’s daddy wouldn’t buy him a dog, or a “bow-wow.” Perhaps he brought home a kitty instead, as there are multiple cats on the cover. Oddly, though, the actual lyrics seem to indicate that this is somehow a fairly serious English political song. Well … whatever. Happy Father’s Day! And Happy Caturday!

  6. Documenting Tiananmen Square →

    Jessica Pigza in the Rare Books Division of NYPL shares items from the collection that depict the demonstrations heard around the world.

  7. For today’s Caturday we have some fashionable men and women looking at blueprints. You might be wondering how in the world this lovely picture is related to cats. Interestingly enough, it was in a 1920s issue of Cat Fancy, a magazine for cat lovers! But for those who need a bit more feline companionship, we’ve also included a photograph from the 1939 World’s Fair of an adorable kitten meowing at a champagne glass of milk. Happy Caturday!

  8. "I always knew from that moment, from the time I found myself at home in that little segregated library in the South, all the way up until I walked up the steps of the New York City library, I always felt, in any town, if I can get to a library, I’ll be OK. It really helped me as a child, and that never left me. So I have a special place for every library, in my heart of hearts."
— RIP Maya Angelou, a literary legend and longtime supporter of The New York Public Library, which holds her papers at its Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture (where she spoke). Angelou also once discussed her love of libraries with us - take a look. 

    "I always knew from that moment, from the time I found myself at home in that little segregated library in the South, all the way up until I walked up the steps of the New York City library, I always felt, in any town, if I can get to a library, I’ll be OK. It really helped me as a child, and that never left me. So I have a special place for every library, in my heart of hearts."

    — RIP Maya Angelou, a literary legend and longtime supporter of The New York Public Library, which holds her papers at its Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture (where she spoke). Angelou also once discussed her love of libraries with us - take a look

  9. In honor of Memorial Day, we share the plaque erected at the Stephen A. Schwarzman Building commemorating the men and women from NYPL who served in the armed forces during World War II. And  to all the heroes among us, we thank you.

    In honor of Memorial Day, we share the plaque erected at the Stephen A. Schwarzman Building commemorating the men and women from NYPL who served in the armed forces during World War II. And  to all the heroes among us, we thank you.

  10. Little girls in floral dresses and a young boy in knickers and a pair of chucks = early mid-20th century New York City. Harlem to be precise and the George Bruce Library to be exact. They’re looking at the window display “Your Public Library,” which was a popular display at the branch and at times featured Americana (like the one above), ships, art from different cultures, Democracy, and other topics. Take a stroll down our memory lane - otherwise known as the Digital Collections - and learn more about NYPL’s historic branches.
And if you love George Bruce Library or one of our other lovely locations, be sure to sign NYPL’s petition and tell City leaders we need more Library funding!

    Little girls in floral dresses and a young boy in knickers and a pair of chucks = early mid-20th century New York City. Harlem to be precise and the George Bruce Library to be exact. They’re looking at the window display “Your Public Library,” which was a popular display at the branch and at times featured Americana (like the one above), ships, art from different cultures, Democracy, and other topics. Take a stroll down our memory lane - otherwise known as the Digital Collections - and learn more about NYPL’s historic branches.

    And if you love George Bruce Library or one of our other lovely locations, be sure to sign NYPL’s petition and tell City leaders we need more Library funding!