1. "I always knew from that moment, from the time I found myself at home in that little segregated library in the South, all the way up until I walked up the steps of the New York City library, I always felt, in any town, if I can get to a library, I’ll be OK. It really helped me as a child, and that never left me. So I have a special place for every library, in my heart of hearts."
— RIP Maya Angelou, a literary legend and longtime supporter of The New York Public Library, which holds her papers at its Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture (where she spoke). Angelou also once discussed her love of libraries with us - take a look. 

    "I always knew from that moment, from the time I found myself at home in that little segregated library in the South, all the way up until I walked up the steps of the New York City library, I always felt, in any town, if I can get to a library, I’ll be OK. It really helped me as a child, and that never left me. So I have a special place for every library, in my heart of hearts."

    — RIP Maya Angelou, a literary legend and longtime supporter of The New York Public Library, which holds her papers at its Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture (where she spoke). Angelou also once discussed her love of libraries with us - take a look

  2. From Books to the Big Screen!

    Jenee at NYPL’s Macomb’s Bridge branch has a blog post to get you up to speed and on track for the big books becoming big movies this year. Read the full blog on our website and learn about the books that will end up on your nightstand. 
     

    This memoir is filled with suspense and humor, it greatly captures a young woman learning to deal with life’s obstacles and her journey to move forward and start over. 

    Everything is perfect! 

    This film will unearth the secrets at the heart of a modern marriage…. 

    A very emotional read that would most likely have you in tears at the theater.

    Libby Day was 7 when her mother and sisters were brutally murdered in an event known as “The Satan Sacrifice of Kinnakee, Kansas.” She testified that the person responsible for the cruel acts was her 15-year-old brother, Ben. 25 years later Libby is approached by the Kill Club, a group of people obsessed with solving notorious crimes. They believe Ben was wrongly accused, and she is eventually sucked into the investigation to uncover the twisted truth. 

     The language is a little tough to get through in the beginning, but once you catch on to the lingo, you’ll be racing to find out what happens. It’ll be very interesting to see how the book is translated in film, especially with the monstrous creatures called Grievers.

    All of these titles can be found at your local library or placed on reserve in our catalog.

  3. This blockbook Apocalypsis is a favorite item for some NYPL employees working with our incredible special collections. Found in our Rare Books Collection, this blockbook is the only one in the world that still has its original cover as far as we know. It’s an illustrated biblical text for less literate believers and was produced in 1465, ten years after the Gutenberg Bible, using a printing method that required the images and text on every page to be carved separately. Clearly, that technology couldn’t compete with movable type, so blockbooks’ heyday was short-lived. There aren’t many of these kinds of books around 550 years later, but we love that the sloppily painted folkloric pictures are in complete opposition to the sleek Gothic type of the Gutenberg. Plus, dragons and the fiery maw of hell!

    This blockbook Apocalypsis is a favorite item for some NYPL employees working with our incredible special collections. Found in our Rare Books Collection, this blockbook is the only one in the world that still has its original cover as far as we know. It’s an illustrated biblical text for less literate believers and was produced in 1465, ten years after the Gutenberg Bible, using a printing method that required the images and text on every page to be carved separately. Clearly, that technology couldn’t compete with movable type, so blockbooks’ heyday was short-lived. There aren’t many of these kinds of books around 550 years later, but we love that the sloppily painted folkloric pictures are in complete opposition to the sleek Gothic type of the Gutenberg. Plus, dragons and the fiery maw of hell!

  4. Uncovering the Truth: Long-form Journalism in the Age of Twitter →

    Tickets are limited, so reserve your free seat today! 

  5. The stories all have female narrators, and all (save one) are inspired by iconic short stories written by men. Galchen’s stories are witty and delightfully intelligent, riffing on works by David Foster Wallace, James Joyce and Haruki Murakami. Each illustrates how the presence of women, as authors and narrators, might have inflected canonical stories…The project as a whole is a lot like Liz Phair’s “Exile in Guyville,” the 1993 record that was a woman’s song-by-song response to the Rolling Stones’ album “Exile on Main Street.”

    — 

    The Los Angeles Times describing Rivka Galchen’s new collection of short stories American Innovations

    Well, when you put it that way, it’s hard not to be excited about the Cullman Center alum's new book and upcoming LIVE from the NYPL event with Karen Russell

  6. It’s a beautiful day in the neighborhood - just ask Patience and Fortitude! Why not visit one of our branches, check out a good book, and read it in a park or under a tree somewhere? Prefer eBooks? We have those, too! 

    It’s a beautiful day in the neighborhood - just ask Patience and Fortitude! Why not visit one of our branches, check out a good book, and read it in a park or under a tree somewhere? Prefer eBooks? We have those, too

  7. This gem from the the NYPL’s Map Division outlines a plan, first devised in 1911 and revisited in 1930, for a “City of New Manhattan” to be created by filling in New York’s upper harbor and subsuming Governor’s Island (presumably Ellis Island and Liberty Island too) in the process. In a boastful or optimistic flourish, the red sections by Battery Park represent lots that had already been sold. The black stripe running down the center is a three-tiered transportation artery: train tracks on the bottom, lanes for cars in the middle, and an airplane landing strip on the top. At least it would have been nice to have all those extra tunnels to Jersey, Brooklyn, and Staten Island though, no?

    This gem from the the NYPL’s Map Division outlines a plan, first devised in 1911 and revisited in 1930, for a “City of New Manhattan” to be created by filling in New York’s upper harbor and subsuming Governor’s Island (presumably Ellis Island and Liberty Island too) in the process. In a boastful or optimistic flourish, the red sections by Battery Park represent lots that had already been sold. The black stripe running down the center is a three-tiered transportation artery: train tracks on the bottom, lanes for cars in the middle, and an airplane landing strip on the top. At least it would have been nice to have all those extra tunnels to Jersey, Brooklyn, and Staten Island though, no?

  8. Big news in e-books as it was announced today that Harper Lee’s Pulitzer Prize winning classic TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD will be released for the first time as an e-book on July 8, HarperCollins Publishers announced today. Of course for those of you who want to read the original, print edition you can check it out at most branches of The New York Public Library OR you can check out the dvd of the classic film as well! The announcement today was made in connection to it being the 88th Birthday of the book’s author Harper Lee. So the NYPL wishes Harper Lee a Happy Birthday as well! 

    Big news in e-books as it was announced today that Harper Lee’s Pulitzer Prize winning classic TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD will be released for the first time as an e-book on July 8, HarperCollins Publishers announced today. Of course for those of you who want to read the original, print edition you can check it out at most branches of The New York Public Library OR you can check out the dvd of the classic film as well! The announcement today was made in connection to it being the 88th Birthday of the book’s author Harper Lee. So the NYPL wishes Harper Lee a Happy Birthday as well! 

  9. Love kids’ books? Love discussing them, reading them and sharing them with others, including your kids? Take a listen to this great appearance by our Youth Materials Coordinator Elizabeth Bird on WNYC’s Leonard Lopate Show yesterday. She talked about a whole host of fun stuff, from her favorite stories to why books become classics. So listen and enjoy! And while you’re at it, check out the Library’s list of the top 100 children’s books of the last 100 years, and plan a trip to our 42nd Street Library to see the free, critically-acclaimed exhibition The ABC Of It: Why Children’s Books Matter. It’s open until Sept. 7, and it’s pretty darn amazing (just ask The New York Times). 

    Love kids’ books? Love discussing them, reading them and sharing them with others, including your kids? Take a listen to this great appearance by our Youth Materials Coordinator Elizabeth Bird on WNYC’s Leonard Lopate Show yesterday. She talked about a whole host of fun stuff, from her favorite stories to why books become classics. So listen and enjoy! And while you’re at it, check out the Library’s list of the top 100 children’s books of the last 100 years, and plan a trip to our 42nd Street Library to see the free, critically-acclaimed exhibition The ABC Of It: Why Children’s Books MatterIt’s open until Sept. 7, and it’s pretty darn amazing (just ask The New York Times). 

  10. 11 Literary Librarians Who Smash Stereotypes →

    Librarians in literature are awesome. (Perhaps not as awesome as librarians in real life, but still pretty durn awesome)