1. Our spectacular exhibit Three Faiths: Judaism, Christianity, Islam closes this Sunday, February 27. If you’ve wanted to check it out in person, now is the time! The gallery was absolutely packed this Sunday, and you’ll want to see these magnificent manuscripts and texts in person, regardless of your religious background.
Three Faiths co-curator David Wachtel gave a tour this weekend to a couple dozen influential faith leaders; the tour was organized by the New York Board of Rabbis.
left to right: Rabbi Joseph Potasnik, Executive Vice President, New York Board of Rabbis;  Reverend A. R. Bernard, Founder & CEO, Christian Cultural Center and  President, Council of Churches of the City of New York; Archbishop Timothy  Michael Dolan, Archdiocese of New York; Rabbi Yaakov Kermaier, President, New  York Board of Rabbis.
Photo by Heather E. Smith.

    Our spectacular exhibit Three Faiths: Judaism, Christianity, Islam closes this Sunday, February 27. If you’ve wanted to check it out in person, now is the time! The gallery was absolutely packed this Sunday, and you’ll want to see these magnificent manuscripts and texts in person, regardless of your religious background.

    Three Faiths co-curator David Wachtel gave a tour this weekend to a couple dozen influential faith leaders; the tour was organized by the New York Board of Rabbis.

    left to right: Rabbi Joseph Potasnik, Executive Vice President, New York Board of Rabbis; Reverend A. R. Bernard, Founder & CEO, Christian Cultural Center and President, Council of Churches of the City of New York; Archbishop Timothy Michael Dolan, Archdiocese of New York; Rabbi Yaakov Kermaier, President, New York Board of Rabbis.

    Photo by Heather E. Smith.

  2. Have you always wanted to learn Manuscript Illumination 101 without taking an entire college course on it? If so, this is definitely your week to stop by the Library and take advantage of our free programming!  The Prince’s School of Traditional Arts is in town from London and will be at several of our Library locations starting tomorrow and through this Wednesday, February 2. For these programs, the focus is on manuscript illumination (gold leaf, pigments, illuminated letters) and some calligraphy but more of a focus on design (symbolic content, artists’ intent, material choice).
A drop in program (that’s right, get there any time you choose!) will be happening at the Three Faiths Scriptorium (at the Library on Fifth Avenue at 42nd Street) on Saturday, January 29 from 10am - 6 pm; Sunday, January 30 from 1-5 pm; Monday, January 31; and Tuesday, February 1 and Wednesday, February 2 from 11:30 am - 5:30 pm. A children’s program is happening this Sunday, January 30 from 1:30-3:30 pm in the Children’s Center at 42nd Street. Additional programming is happening at several of our other branches as well.
This winter weather gives a great opportunity to uncover your artistic side, so we hope you join us!  For information on any Three Faiths-related proramming, visit the Three Faiths website.
These programs have been supported through the generosity of the Coexist Foundation.

    Have you always wanted to learn Manuscript Illumination 101 without taking an entire college course on it? If so, this is definitely your week to stop by the Library and take advantage of our free programming!  The Prince’s School of Traditional Arts is in town from London and will be at several of our Library locations starting tomorrow and through this Wednesday, February 2. For these programs, the focus is on manuscript illumination (gold leaf, pigments, illuminated letters) and some calligraphy but more of a focus on design (symbolic content, artists’ intent, material choice).

    A drop in program (that’s right, get there any time you choose!) will be happening at the Three Faiths Scriptorium (at the Library on Fifth Avenue at 42nd Street) on Saturday, January 29 from 10am - 6 pm; Sunday, January 30 from 1-5 pm; Monday, January 31; and Tuesday, February 1 and Wednesday, February 2 from 11:30 am - 5:30 pm. A children’s program is happening this Sunday, January 30 from 1:30-3:30 pm in the Children’s Center at 42nd Street. Additional programming is happening at several of our other branches as well.


    This winter weather gives a great opportunity to uncover your artistic side, so we hope you join us!  For information on any Three Faiths-related proramming, visit the Three Faiths website.

    These programs have been supported through the generosity of the Coexist Foundation.

  3. A Muslim, a nun, and a rabbi walk into a library…

    …and they talked about their religions in an open, thoughtful manner.

    No, it’s not a joke, it’s a day at the Library! As part of our Three Faiths programming, we have a series called The 411 on Faith: Communities in Dialogue, in which local faith leaders get together and discuss their beliefs and how religious traditions shape life in NYC. The above photo was taken at the Woodlawn Heights Library program in December, which was filled with neighborhood types asking intelligent questions. If you’ve ever wanted to ask a Muslim, a nun, or a rabbi a question about their religion, here’s your chance! The remaining 411 on Faith programs are at the St. Agnes Library (Upper West Side) on Thursday, January 13; the Webster Library (Upper East Side) on Thursday, February 17; and at the Riverdale Library (in Da Bronx) on Tuesday, February 22.

    (In this picture, from left to right: Dr. Muhammad Al-Rahman, Director of the Faith and Cultural Wellness Center in the Bronx; Rabbi Dr. Jonathan I. Rosenblatt, Senior Rabbi of the Riverdale Jewish Center; and Sr. Mary Jane Deodati, Sister of Divine Compassion, and the Executive Director of the Thorpe Family Residence in the Bronx’s Crotona/Fordham section. Not pictured is series moderator Henry Goldschmidt, Education Program Associate at the Interfaith Center of New York.)

  4. What, pray tell, is this curious object, on view now in the Library’s Three Faiths exhibit?
You guessed right if your answer was “It’s a Bible Belt, of course!”
Technically, this object is actually “a girdle binding” or “girdle book”. Clergymen, nobles, and medieval monks wore them, but they were also very popular with the women, since a girdle belt was already worn above the waistline during this time period, the 13th to 16th century. What were the women reading? The Book of Hours was a popular choice.
What’s really cool about the Bible Belt is that it is at all. (Only 23 are known to exist worldwide.) Not only is this an old item – the Bavarian devotion book inside is from 1454 – but this was an object used in daily life, worn on the body while people went about their daily lives. People cleaned the house, rode horses, and walked around villages, all with this hands-free device worn around their waist.
Even more interesting is that the book was hung upside down when worn, so if one wanted to read it while seated or walking, she just pulled the book up and the text was right side up. It didn’t have to be removed or taken out of its binding. This likely resulted in many more people being diligent about their daily prayers and reading!

    What, pray tell, is this curious object, on view now in the Library’s Three Faiths exhibit?

    You guessed right if your answer was “It’s a Bible Belt, of course!”

    Technically, this object is actually “a girdle binding” or “girdle book”. Clergymen, nobles, and medieval monks wore them, but they were also very popular with the women, since a girdle belt was already worn above the waistline during this time period, the 13th to 16th century. What were the women reading? The Book of Hours was a popular choice.

    What’s really cool about the Bible Belt is that it is at all. (Only 23 are known to exist worldwide.) Not only is this an old item – the Bavarian devotion book inside is from 1454 – but this was an object used in daily life, worn on the body while people went about their daily lives. People cleaned the house, rode horses, and walked around villages, all with this hands-free device worn around their waist.

    Even more interesting is that the book was hung upside down when worn, so if one wanted to read it while seated or walking, she just pulled the book up and the text was right side up. It didn’t have to be removed or taken out of its binding. This likely resulted in many more people being diligent about their daily prayers and reading!

  5. We’re all praying to the same God. We’re pretty much saying the same thing in each book … As far as religion, I take things that ring true to me. I don’t have a denomination … I just believe in God.

    — Jay-Z speaking about faith during his LIVE talk on Nov. 15. His quote segues beautifully into our Three Faiths exhibition at the Stephen A. Schwarzman building, which highlights how Judaism, Christianity and Islam are interrelated. It’s a perfect FREE show to visit this weekend or during a holiday week!

  6. This shrine outside of St. Michael’s Church in Sunset Park, Brooklyn is one of the latest submissions to our "Faith On The Street" project, which aims to capture the way people interact with faith in their everyday lives. Participate! Send in pics to ThreeFaiths@nypl.org. The project, by the way, is tied to our incredible “Three Faiths: Judaism, Christianity, Islam” exhibit at the Stephen A. Schwarzman Building on 42 Street. It highlights about 200 ancient texts and artifacts (all from our collections) connected with the three largest Abrahamic faiths. The exhibit - which shows how the religions are interrelated instead of how they conflict - has gotten rave reviews. Thousands have already seen it. It’s free. Need something to do? Drop on by. In the meantime - snap some photos.

    This shrine outside of St. Michael’s Church in Sunset Park, Brooklyn is one of the latest submissions to our "Faith On The Street" project, which aims to capture the way people interact with faith in their everyday lives. Participate! Send in pics to ThreeFaiths@nypl.org. The project, by the way, is tied to our incredible “Three Faiths: Judaism, Christianity, Islam” exhibit at the Stephen A. Schwarzman Building on 42 Street. It highlights about 200 ancient texts and artifacts (all from our collections) connected with the three largest Abrahamic faiths. The exhibit - which shows how the religions are interrelated instead of how they conflict - has gotten rave reviews. Thousands have already seen it. It’s free. Need something to do? Drop on by. In the meantime - snap some photos.

  7. OYG: OH YOUR GOD
(Or Faith On The Streets)
Faith’s a fascinating thing in that it’s observed and perceived differently by everyone. With that in mind, we asked New Yorkers to send in photos of how and where they see expressions of sacred objects as part of our exhibition Three Faiths: Judaism, Christianity, Islam.
One of our readers sent in this photo, in which he says he sees Saint Moses the Black over the Hudson River from Harlem.
Where do you see faith on the street? Photoreply here, or email your image to threefaiths@nypl.org.

    OYG: OH YOUR GOD

    (Or Faith On The Streets)

    Faith’s a fascinating thing in that it’s observed and perceived differently by everyone. With that in mind, we asked New Yorkers to send in photos of how and where they see expressions of sacred objects as part of our exhibition Three Faiths: Judaism, Christianity, Islam.

    One of our readers sent in this photo, in which he says he sees Saint Moses the Black over the Hudson River from Harlem.

    Where do you see faith on the street? Photoreply here, or email your image to threefaiths@nypl.org.