1. The Five Most Romantic Proposals In Classic Literature →

  2. Wishing all our lovely followers a very happy Valentine’s Day! To celebrate we present a few words from the 1892 ballad Dearest, “sung with immense success by Laura Schirmer Mapleson” in the opera comique Fadette. And now, for your enjoyment - the lyrics composed by B. B. Vallentine (we kid you not):
O dearest! O dearest!Words can never tell…How strong my love, how pure and true,you dearest, yes dearest tho’ I love you wellI’d have you love me as I love you,Love me too… as I love you,You know I love you well, you know I love you well….Ah! Love me too.

    Wishing all our lovely followers a very happy Valentine’s Day! To celebrate we present a few words from the 1892 ballad Dearest, “sung with immense success by Laura Schirmer Mapleson” in the opera comique Fadette. And now, for your enjoyment - the lyrics composed by B. B. Vallentine (we kid you not):

    O dearest! O dearest!
    Words can never tell…
    How strong my love, how pure and true,
    you dearest, yes dearest tho’ I love you well
    I’d have you love me as I love you,
    Love me too… as I love you,
    You know I love you well, you know I love you well….
    Ah! Love me too.

  3. Generosity Day!

    On Valentine’s Day, don’t give chocolates, give an act of kindness!  At the NYPL, our job is to help you better yourself. We hope this also translates into you passing on the goodwill to your friends, family and community members.

    So, let’s help reboot Monday as Generosity Day (the brainchild of Sasha Dichter)!   Examples of great things to do on #generosityday:

    Give money to….a street musician, a homeless person, your favorite charity

    Take old clothes from your closet and give them to goodwill

    Leave a $5 tip for a $2 coffee

    Introduce yourself to someone you see every day but have never said hello to

    Bring in lunch for your co-workers

    Give someone a compliment

    Have a blast!

  4. Valentine’s Day is just a few days away! Are you thinking about love? We are, because it’s one of the topics of the Radioactive exhibition up at our main building on Fifth Avenue at 42nd Street. The full name of the exhibition is Radioactive: Marie & Pierre Curie, A Tale of Love and Fallout, and seeing this free exhibit would be a fantastic part of a cheap date for science geeks. We know this.

    Here’s a video from the Radioactive exhibition website; its an animation by Maayan Tzuriel, based on the drawings of Lauren Redniss. Chopin’s “Ballade No. 4” is performed by Martha Kato. It’s one of four videos produced by students at Parsons the New School for Design in collaboration with NYPL and Redniss for the Radioactive exhibit, book, and website. Appropriately, the title of the video is “The Instability of Matter.”