1. 
I iz MOVING! 
Our new Stereogranimator site (which was created by NYPL Labs and allows you to turn historic stereographs from the Library’s collections into animated GIFs or 3-D images) has gotten tons and tons of attention this week (as well as tens of thousands of hits), so we thought we’d use it for this week’s Caturday! Check out this amazing dancing cat, originally photographed in September 1918. The original image is in our Robert N. Dennis collection of stereoscopic views. How cool is it to breathe new life into these old photos? Gotta love it.

    I iz MOVING! 

    Our new Stereogranimator site (which was created by NYPL Labs and allows you to turn historic stereographs from the Library’s collections into animated GIFs or 3-D images) has gotten tons and tons of attention this week (as well as tens of thousands of hits), so we thought we’d use it for this week’s Caturday! Check out this amazing dancing cat, originally photographed in September 1918. The original image is in our Robert N. Dennis collection of stereoscopic views. How cool is it to breathe new life into these old photos? Gotta love it.

  2. The Library has just launched Stereogranimator, a site that lets users turn our historic collection of stereographs into animated images like the one above. Read all about it in the Times and then go play! It’s the latest way we’re using technology to bring our collections to the public, following our What’s on the Menu, Biblion iPad app and map warping projects.
Caturday will never be the same …

    The Library has just launched Stereogranimator, a site that lets users turn our historic collection of stereographs into animated images like the one above. Read all about it in the Times and then go play! It’s the latest way we’re using technology to bring our collections to the public, following our What’s on the Menu, Biblion iPad app and map warping projects.

    Caturday will never be the same …

  3. Valentine’s Day is just a few days away! Are you thinking about love? We are, because it’s one of the topics of the Radioactive exhibition up at our main building on Fifth Avenue at 42nd Street. The full name of the exhibition is Radioactive: Marie & Pierre Curie, A Tale of Love and Fallout, and seeing this free exhibit would be a fantastic part of a cheap date for science geeks. We know this.

    Here’s a video from the Radioactive exhibition website; its an animation by Maayan Tzuriel, based on the drawings of Lauren Redniss. Chopin’s “Ballade No. 4” is performed by Martha Kato. It’s one of four videos produced by students at Parsons the New School for Design in collaboration with NYPL and Redniss for the Radioactive exhibit, book, and website. Appropriately, the title of the video is “The Instability of Matter.”

  4. The Radioactive website is hot! →

    Check out the brand spankin’ new website for the Radioactive exhibition! It is a collaboration between The New York Public Library and Parsons the New School for Design. Fourteen Parsons students and their teacher, Lauren Redniss (author, artist, Former Cullman Center Fellow) worked with the NYPL to create this interactive, online exhibit in conjunction with the Radioactive exhibition now up at the Library on Fifth Avenue at 42nd Street. Animations about love and science; a Raidon Game, and a virtual way to make cyanotypes all await you!

  5. It’s alive! The NYPL has animated the first book Frankenstein author Mary Shelley ever worked on - a kid’s story called Mounseer Nongtongpaw, or the Discoveries of John Bull in a Trip to Paris. It was published by Shelley’s anarchist philosopher dad William Godwin in 1808 when she was a mere 10-years-old and is “probably the first book publication Mary Shelley was ever involved in,” said Charles Carter, a librarian from the Pforzheimer Collection, which houses the works of Percy Bysshe Shelley, his family and his friends. “She basically came up with a plot sketch for what was going to happen in the story. She had help from adults, but still, it’s very interesting.” In-house digital producer Jonathan Blanc put the video together in only a few weeks, Carter said, as a way to promote a new exhibit opening today called Shelley’s Ghost at Oxford University’s Bodleian Library. The show - a version of which will come to NYPL in 2012 - features 12 of the collection’s “greatest treasures,” said Carter, who wrote a blog post about it today. “I was trying to think of ways to promote it that would be adaptable to an electronic medium,” he said. “This particular item, because it’s so heavily illustrated, would lend itself well, I thought. I was thinking of a Reading Rainbow kind of thing.” Well done, and appropriate. The story was originally based on a comedic song from the early 1790s. Mary Shelley and company remixed it into the book. Since the book and its lavish artwork are part of the public domain, we were free to remix that and create our little animated adaptation. Some things never change.