1. The Library’s new app for iPad, Frankenstein: The Afterlife of Shelley’s Circle, asks users to engage in the central themes of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein in new ways. One feature allows readers to respond to questions that relate to the source material, engaging in a dialogue about everything from what books inspired them as children to ethics in science. 
Here’s how Lance Bohy, an IT Architect from Seattle answered a question about technology:
Q: People today are perhaps more likely to read the novel Frankenstein as an e-book, which is somewhat ironic given that a major theme of the novel is technology run amok. As the monster comes to life, Victor Frankenstein says: “I had worked hard for nearly two years, for the sole purpose of infusing life into an inanimate body. … But now that I had finished, the beauty of the dream vanished, and breathless horror and disgust filled my heart.” Can we see e-books, now in their infancy, leading to the fulfillment of a dream — or starting down a path that leads to ultimate horror, the dream turned nightmare?
A: A dream turned nightmare? Nonsense. This work that I now hold in my hands bears evidence to just how good we have it. With this device half as thick as my finger I have book, history lesson, master class, art gallery and more all within just this one app alone. This is the stuff of dreams! This is not simply Gutenberg-redux, this is more. Much more. NYPL’s Biblion is a shining example of what is possible and coolest part: we’ve just begun! I can’t wait to see where we go from here.
Now it’s your turn: fire up your iPad, download Frankenstein, and tell us what you think.

    The Library’s new app for iPad, Frankenstein: The Afterlife of Shelley’s Circle, asks users to engage in the central themes of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein in new ways. One feature allows readers to respond to questions that relate to the source material, engaging in a dialogue about everything from what books inspired them as children to ethics in science. 

    Here’s how Lance Bohy, an IT Architect from Seattle answered a question about technology:

    Q: People today are perhaps more likely to read the novel Frankenstein as an e-book, which is somewhat ironic given that a major theme of the novel is technology run amok. As the monster comes to life, Victor Frankenstein says: “I had worked hard for nearly two years, for the sole purpose of infusing life into an inanimate body. … But now that I had finished, the beauty of the dream vanished, and breathless horror and disgust filled my heart.” Can we see e-books, now in their infancy, leading to the fulfillment of a dream — or starting down a path that leads to ultimate horror, the dream turned nightmare?

    A: A dream turned nightmare? Nonsense. This work that I now hold in my hands bears evidence to just how good we have it. With this device half as thick as my finger I have book, history lesson, master class, art gallery and more all within just this one app alone. This is the stuff of dreams! This is not simply Gutenberg-redux, this is more. Much more. NYPL’s Biblion is a shining example of what is possible and coolest part: we’ve just begun! I can’t wait to see where we go from here.

    Now it’s your turn: fire up your iPad, download Frankenstein, and tell us what you think.

  2. explore-blog:

    The New York Public Library releases Biblion: Frankenstein for iPad, exploring rare collections of Mary Shelley materials that continue to inspire ideas and storytelling today – a sequel to NYPL’s Biblion: World’s Fair.

    In case you haven’t seen this yet! 

  3. In honor of National Watermelon Day, we present this photo from our Manuscripts and Archives Division of the lovely Mary Louise Keller - who weighed 107lbs according to the man running the “Official Guess Your Weight” booth at the 1939-40 World’s Fair - sitting atop a giant 160lb watermelon from Hope, Arkansas, a weight which stumped the guesser.  
Download our free app Biblion for more highlights of the Fair and all its citrullus lanatus (that’s watermelon in latin) glory. 

    In honor of National Watermelon Day, we present this photo from our Manuscripts and Archives Division of the lovely Mary Louise Keller - who weighed 107lbs according to the man running the “Official Guess Your Weight” booth at the 1939-40 World’s Fair - sitting atop a giant 160lb watermelon from Hope, Arkansas, a weight which stumped the guesser.  

    Download our free app Biblion for more highlights of the Fair and all its citrullus lanatus (that’s watermelon in latin) glory

  4. Tonight is the Major League Baseball All-Star game, so we thought we’d share a baseball-related gem from our collection: a photo taken at the 1939 World’s Fair of Babe Ruth teaching kids how to hit. It’s from the 1939-40 World’s Fair Collection in our Manuscripts and Archives Division. By the way, if you’re interested in the World’s Fair, you should definitely download the inaugural issue of our free app Biblion, which is highlighting the Fair. The app is worth checking out - it’s a hit! OK, that was a lame pun, but you should still check out the app.

    Tonight is the Major League Baseball All-Star game, so we thought we’d share a baseball-related gem from our collection: a photo taken at the 1939 World’s Fair of Babe Ruth teaching kids how to hit. It’s from the 1939-40 World’s Fair Collection in our Manuscripts and Archives Division. By the way, if you’re interested in the World’s Fair, you should definitely download the inaugural issue of our free app Biblion, which is highlighting the Fair. The app is worth checking out - it’s a hit! OK, that was a lame pun, but you should still check out the app.

  5. This video, part of the Biblion World’s Fair app available for download from iTunes, represents a story made from items available in The New York Public Library’s collections. In attempting to recreate the Democracity show—the central Theme Exhibit at the Fair—researchers from the Library uncovered draft versions of the show’s narration as well as lighting and music cues. Then, a team of animators blended photographs of the Perisphere’s interior and early Centerton models—taken from the Library’s online Digital Gallery—and re-mixed these images with new 3D animations, giving a sense of how the Fair’s visitors might have experienced “Tomorrow’s World in Miniature.” As a small chorus sings Still’s “Rising Tide” theme, Paul LeClerc, the tenth head of The New York Public Library, gives voice to the narration.

    If you want to re-mix your own version, check out these images on digitalgallery.nypl.org: 1684389, 1684119. 1684481, 1684179, 1683989, 1683967, 1683959, 1684003, 1683969, 1683981, 1683977, 1670281, 1683993, 1683987, 1684413, 1684613, 1684353.