1. Let’s play! There are only a couple days left to enjoy Play Things: 600 Years of Games and Other Merriments, an exhibition that explores the long and varied tradition of how works on paper not only participated in but actively facilitated conditions of playfulness. From early paper dolls, to kites, word games, photos, and optical illusions, the exhibition invites you to literally play and interact with some materials, and engage with other artifacts in a more figuratively playful way. 
Play Things is on display through Sunday, March 16 in the Stephen A. Schwarzman Building’s Print and Stokes Gallery. 

    Let’s play! There are only a couple days left to enjoy Play Things: 600 Years of Games and Other Merriments, an exhibition that explores the long and varied tradition of how works on paper not only participated in but actively facilitated conditions of playfulness. From early paper dolls, to kites, word games, photos, and optical illusions, the exhibition invites you to literally play and interact with some materials, and engage with other artifacts in a more figuratively playful way. 

    Play Things is on display through Sunday, March 16 in the Stephen A. Schwarzman Building’s Print and Stokes Gallery

  2. In case you needed further proof as to why Tom Wolfe is awesome, yesterday The New York Times broke the news that The New York Public Library’s Manuscripts & Archives Division has acquired The Tom Wolfe Papers. The collection is amazing in its breadth in that it will contain rarely seen drafts and correspondence between Wolfe and such friends of his such as Hunter S. Thompson and William Buckley. And yes there will be plenty of materials in the collection related to his iconic books such as The Right Stuff, The Bonfire of the Vanities, and A Man In Full. And of course all of Tom Wolfe’s books can be found at branches throughout the entire NYPL system!   

    In case you needed further proof as to why Tom Wolfe is awesome, yesterday The New York Times broke the news that The New York Public Library’s Manuscripts & Archives Division has acquired The Tom Wolfe Papers. The collection is amazing in its breadth in that it will contain rarely seen drafts and correspondence between Wolfe and such friends of his such as Hunter S. Thompson and William Buckley. And yes there will be plenty of materials in the collection related to his iconic books such as The Right Stuff, The Bonfire of the Vanities, and A Man In Full. And of course all of Tom Wolfe’s books can be found at branches throughout the entire NYPL system!   

  3. BORN TO BE WILDE! Happy 159th birthday to the great Oscar Wilde! You can check out most of Wilde’s books at your local New York Public Library branch. The New York Public Library’s Berg Collection is also fortunate enough to have many of the Oscar Wilde Papers within its research collection. So Happy Birthday Oscar Wilde you WILDE and crazy guy! 

    BORN TO BE WILDE! Happy 159th birthday to the great Oscar Wilde! You can check out most of Wilde’s books at your local New York Public Library branch. The New York Public Library’s Berg Collection is also fortunate enough to have many of the Oscar Wilde Papers within its research collection. So Happy Birthday Oscar Wilde you WILDE and crazy guy! 

  4. Congratulations to all of the Academy Award nominees today! In celebration of the nominations it has becoming an annual tradition for us to post a photo of one of our most famous treasures at The New York Public Library for the Performing Arts. Yep, believe it or not, but The New York Public Library for the Performing Arts houses TWO Academy Awards in its collections. One is the Oscar that Paul Muni won in 1937 for Best Actor in THE STORY OF LOUIS PASTEUR and the other belonged to Burl Ives who won it for Best Supporting Actor in 1959 for THE BIG COUNTRY. 

    Congratulations to all of the Academy Award nominees today! In celebration of the nominations it has becoming an annual tradition for us to post a photo of one of our most famous treasures at The New York Public Library for the Performing Arts. Yep, believe it or not, but The New York Public Library for the Performing Arts houses TWO Academy Awards in its collections. One is the Oscar that Paul Muni won in 1937 for Best Actor in THE STORY OF LOUIS PASTEUR and the other belonged to Burl Ives who won it for Best Supporting Actor in 1959 for THE BIG COUNTRY

  5. We just had to share this with you! While taking a look at the Library’s Timothy Leary archives with our good friends at The Verge (piece coming to a computer near you later this winter), we discovered that Mr. Leary had a nintendo wrist controller  Power Glove (immortalized in the 1989 film The Wizard aka A 100 Minute Long Commercial for Super Mario Brothers 3)… and Adidas sneakers. Very clean, red-laced Adidas sneakers. This made us very happy.

    We just had to share this with you! While taking a look at the Library’s Timothy Leary archives with our good friends at The Verge (piece coming to a computer near you later this winter), we discovered that Mr. Leary had a nintendo wrist controller  Power Glove (immortalized in the 1989 film The Wizard aka A 100 Minute Long Commercial for Super Mario Brothers 3)… and Adidas sneakers. Very clean, red-laced Adidas sneakers. This made us very happy.

  6. For this week’s Mustache Monday - the first in the month of Movember (no that’s not a typo) - we have another unidentified man whose portrait is in the A.G. Spalding Baseball Collection. This means he has something to do with either cricket or baseball, but we don’t know much more. The inscription along the bottom of the photo reads, “Bailey, San Fran co.”
 albumen print ; 10 x 6 cm. The A.G. Spalding Baseball Collection. NYPL, Photography Collection, Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Division of Art, Prints and Photograph.

    For this week’s Mustache Monday - the first in the month of Movember (no that’s not a typo) - we have another unidentified man whose portrait is in the A.G. Spalding Baseball Collection. This means he has something to do with either cricket or baseball, but we don’t know much more. The inscription along the bottom of the photo reads, “Bailey, San Fran co.”

    albumen print ; 10 x 6 cm. The A.G. Spalding Baseball Collection. NYPL, Photography Collection, Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Division of Art, Prints and Photograph.

  7. We know you’ll like this, Tumblr — it’s Obed Hussey, Inventor First Man to Patent the Reaper. 
According to Ohio History Central,

Obed Hussey was born in 1791 to Quaker parents. As a young man, he became a sailor on a whaling ship, but he eventually forsook this career. He moved to Cincinnati, Ohio, where he created a farming machine known as the reaper in 1833. The reaper was a horse-drawn machine that chopped and collected a farmer’s grain. Hussey was the first man to patent his invention, but he was not the first person to invent such a machine.

    We know you’ll like this, Tumblr — it’s Obed Hussey, Inventor First Man to Patent the Reaper.

    According to Ohio History Central,

    Obed Hussey was born in 1791 to Quaker parents. As a young man, he became a sailor on a whaling ship, but he eventually forsook this career. He moved to Cincinnati, Ohio, where he created a farming machine known as the reaper in 1833. The reaper was a horse-drawn machine that chopped and collected a farmer’s grain. Hussey was the first man to patent his invention, but he was not the first person to invent such a machine.

  8. Colored woodcut, “An illustration of writing brushes.” (Kokushi Daijiten, 1868)

    Colored woodcut, “An illustration of writing brushes.” (Kokushi Daijiten, 1868)

  9. The Jerome Robbins Dance Division yields some cool suprises: 
The collection contains a number of items relating to current events in the 1950s and ‘60s. In particular, Robbins was keenly interested in the civil rights movement. 
One treasure discovered in the audio collection is “Project 65: Mississippi Summer,” a two-hour radio documentary produced in 1965 by the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, exploring the 1964 Mississippi Freedom Summer Project.
The doc allows activists, locals, blacks, whites, mayors, tenant farmers, and schoolchildren to speak for themselves, creating a multi-faceted portrait of the struggle for African-American civil rights. Fannie Lou Hamer describes being beaten in a Winona, Mississippi jail; a young volunteer from Wisconsin canvases for the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party; the president of the pro-segregation White Citizens’ Councils defends their purpose; farmer Hartman Turnbow describes his attempt to register to vote and the subsequent firebombing of his home. 
Also in the Jerome Robbins Audio Collection is an archival recording of a 1964 gathering of the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) in Greenwood, Mississippi, at which Harry Belafonte and Sidney Poitier (who are heard on the tape delivering speeches) appeared to present funds raised for SNCC; and radio news reporting about race riots in Detroit, Milwaukee, and other cities in July, 1967.
Another gem to emerge from the collection is a complete audio recording of the television program Night Beat, on which John Wingate interviews Jack Kerouac and Earle Hyman. Hyman discusses his struggles and triumphs as an African-American actor and his love of theater.
Kerouac, on the occasion of the publication of The Subterraneans, defines Beat vocabulary for his host and discusses the controversy surrounding the “Beat Generation,” his writing process, his cats, his painting, and his study of Buddhism.
These extremely rare sound recordings are now available for research use on-site at the Library for the Performing Arts, along with a two-hour lecture-performance by Stephen Sondheim at the 92nd Street Y in 1971, a radio interview with Lee Harvey Oswald, a recording of Arthur Miller’s biblical musical Up From Paradise, archival recordings of traditional Japanese music, and other audio materials reflecting Jerome Robbins’s wide-ranging, ever-searching intellect.
- Imogen Smith

    The Jerome Robbins Dance Division yields some cool suprises

    The collection contains a number of items relating to current events in the 1950s and ‘60s. In particular, Robbins was keenly interested in the civil rights movement. 

    One treasure discovered in the audio collection is “Project 65: Mississippi Summer,” a two-hour radio documentary produced in 1965 by the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, exploring the 1964 Mississippi Freedom Summer Project.

    The doc allows activists, locals, blacks, whites, mayors, tenant farmers, and schoolchildren to speak for themselves, creating a multi-faceted portrait of the struggle for African-American civil rights. Fannie Lou Hamer describes being beaten in a Winona, Mississippi jail; a young volunteer from Wisconsin canvases for the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party; the president of the pro-segregation White Citizens’ Councils defends their purpose; farmer Hartman Turnbow describes his attempt to register to vote and the subsequent firebombing of his home. 

    Also in the Jerome Robbins Audio Collection is an archival recording of a 1964 gathering of the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) in Greenwood, Mississippi, at which Harry Belafonte and Sidney Poitier (who are heard on the tape delivering speeches) appeared to present funds raised for SNCC; and radio news reporting about race riots in Detroit, Milwaukee, and other cities in July, 1967.

    Another gem to emerge from the collection is a complete audio recording of the television program Night Beat, on which John Wingate interviews Jack Kerouac and Earle Hyman. Hyman discusses his struggles and triumphs as an African-American actor and his love of theater.

    Kerouac, on the occasion of the publication of The Subterraneans, defines Beat vocabulary for his host and discusses the controversy surrounding the “Beat Generation,” his writing process, his cats, his painting, and his study of Buddhism.

    These extremely rare sound recordings are now available for research use on-site at the Library for the Performing Arts, along with a two-hour lecture-performance by Stephen Sondheim at the 92nd Street Y in 1971, a radio interview with Lee Harvey Oswald, a recording of Arthur Miller’s biblical musical Up From Paradise, archival recordings of traditional Japanese music, and other audio materials reflecting Jerome Robbins’s wide-ranging, ever-searching intellect.

    - Imogen Smith

  10. Some delightful photos from the Library’s A.G. Spalding Collection are currently blowing up around the internet, so we thought you Tumblr fans would like to see them, too. 
Click through for more.

    Some delightful photos from the Library’s A.G. Spalding Collection are currently blowing up around the internet, so we thought you Tumblr fans would like to see them, too. 

    Click through for more.