1. lana-arts:

New York Public Library.

    lana-arts:

    New York Public Library.

  2. A “Conversation Portrait” of Van Cliburn by Flash Rosenberg. For more, visit http://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.10150902767553189.440253.74159958188&type=1.

    A “Conversation Portrait” of Van Cliburn by Flash Rosenberg. For more, visit http://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.10150902767553189.440253.74159958188&type=1.

  3. This look, from 1920, feels very fashion forward, no? Published in La mode féminine de 1490 à 1920. (Paris: Nilsson, 1926).

    This look, from 1920, feels very fashion forward, no? Published in La mode féminine de 1490 à 1920. (Paris: Nilsson, 1926).

  4. livefromthenypl:

“I was wondering whether to do a memoir when I got a hysterically apologetic letter from the director of the National Portrait Gallery in London. It turned out that they produced a catalog in which one of the captions read, ‘Martin Amis with the late Christopher Hitchens.’When you read about yourself in the past tense, it does concentrate your mind. I’m not late. And it’s professionally damaging to be told you’re dead because then people won’t ask you to write books – or review them.” —Christopher Hitchens at LIVE from the NYPL in June 2010.
Above is a slide from LIVE’s Artist in Residence Flash Rosenberg’s upcoming Conversation Portrait for the aforementioned Christopher Hitchens event. 

    livefromthenypl:

    I was wondering whether to do a memoir when I got a hysterically apologetic letter from the director of the National Portrait Gallery in London. It turned out that they produced a catalog in which one of the captions read, ‘Martin Amis with the late Christopher Hitchens.’When you read about yourself in the past tense, it does concentrate your mind. I’m not late. And it’s professionally damaging to be told you’re dead because then people won’t ask you to write books – or review them.” —Christopher Hitchens at LIVE from the NYPL in June 2010.

    Above is a slide from LIVE’s Artist in Residence Flash Rosenberg’s upcoming Conversation Portrait for the aforementioned Christopher Hitchens event. 

  5. We thought this “Fables And Their Morals” cigarette card from between 1908 and 1919 could make for a fun - and educational - Caturday. See, according to the back of the card (which is in our George Arents Collection), a cat “with much care” dressed himself as a doctor and offered a cage of canaries his assistance because he ” heard there was illness amongst” them. The canaries were wise to the cat, though, and told him that as long as he kept the canary door shut they would be quite well. The “moral” of the card: hypocrites discovered are outcasts, and cats hide their claws. Don’t really get it, but the picture is funny! Happy Caturday!

    We thought this “Fables And Their Morals” cigarette card from between 1908 and 1919 could make for a fun - and educational - Caturday. See, according to the back of the card (which is in our George Arents Collection), a cat “with much care” dressed himself as a doctor and offered a cage of canaries his assistance because he ” heard there was illness amongst” them. The canaries were wise to the cat, though, and told him that as long as he kept the canary door shut they would be quite well. The “moral” of the card: hypocrites discovered are outcasts, and cats hide their claws. Don’t really get it, but the picture is funny! Happy Caturday!

  6. Since it’s supposed to rain cats and dogs in New York this weekend thanks to Hurricane Irene, we thought we’d use this week’s Caturday to share this image of a man and his cat dealing with bad weather. The caricature was engraved sometime between 1818 and 1830, and is located in our Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Division of Art, Prints and Photographs. While this is fun, New Yorkers should take the warnings about this hurricane seriously! Be careful, people! First read this NYPL blog post about hurricane preparedness, then check out some NYPL eBooks from the safety of your home (NYPL is closed today and tomorrow, remember). Then get lost in a book until you turn on the news and hear the storm is over!

    Since it’s supposed to rain cats and dogs in New York this weekend thanks to Hurricane Irene, we thought we’d use this week’s Caturday to share this image of a man and his cat dealing with bad weather. The caricature was engraved sometime between 1818 and 1830, and is located in our Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Division of Art, Prints and Photographs. While this is fun, New Yorkers should take the warnings about this hurricane seriously! Be careful, people! First read this NYPL blog post about hurricane preparedness, then check out some NYPL eBooks from the safety of your home (NYPL is closed today and tomorrow, remember). Then get lost in a book until you turn on the news and hear the storm is over!

  7. Happy birthday to J.M. Barrie, the author who created Peter Pan, first for the stage in 1904 and then for a novel in 1911. This children’s book illustration of Peter and Tinkerbell and the gang from our Mid-Manhattan Picture Collection seemed a fitting tribute. And remember - don’t grow up.

    Happy birthday to J.M. Barrie, the author who created Peter Pan, first for the stage in 1904 and then for a novel in 1911. This children’s book illustration of Peter and Tinkerbell and the gang from our Mid-Manhattan Picture Collection seemed a fitting tribute. And remember - don’t grow up.

  8. "Dogs and cats living together - mass hysteria!" Yes, love and harmony are in the air for Caturday. In honor of rapidly approaching Valentine’s Day, here’s an image of an adorable kitten who seemingly hearts a cute dog. And the feeling is clearly mutual. Everyone now … "Awwww." This drawing was originally printed in The Illustrated London News in 1867 and is now in our Mid-Manhattan Picture Collection. And it gave us an excuse to quote the movie “Ghostbusters,” which was filmed at our landmark building! What a great Caturday!

    "Dogs and cats living together - mass hysteria!" Yes, love and harmony are in the air for Caturday. In honor of rapidly approaching Valentine’s Day, here’s an image of an adorable kitten who seemingly hearts a cute dog. And the feeling is clearly mutual. Everyone now … "Awwww." This drawing was originally printed in The Illustrated London News in 1867 and is now in our Mid-Manhattan Picture Collection. And it gave us an excuse to quote the movie “Ghostbusters,” which was filmed at our landmark building! What a great Caturday!