1. Happy 115th birthday to E.B. White! During his life, White wrote some of best known children’s books of the past century, such as Charlotte’s Web, Stuart Little, and The Trumpet of the Swan. He captured the imagination of children everywhere with his talking animals, while at the same time teaching them important lessons, like the value of friendship.

    Here at NYPL, we love children’s books! So much, in fact, that we decided to create an exhibition, The ABC of It: Why Children’s Books Matter, where you can actually hear E.B. White read from Charlotte’s Web! If you want relive some memories of your childhood, come check it out at the Stephen A. Schwarzman building through September 7th. Or, you can always stop by your local NYPL branch and pick up a copy of any of E.B. White’s stories today!

  2. Hello friends!

    We’re happy to share some exciting news: the Library’s exhibit, The ABC of It: Why Children’s Books Matter, has been extended until September 7th! 

    Please note that while the exhibition will be closed March 24th and 25th, lovers of children’s literature will be able to stop by the Stephen A. Schwarzman Building on 42nd Street for six more months! So if you haven’t seen this amazing collection of the world’s most beloved children’s books, you now have more time to! Bring a friend and stop by the exhibit soon! 

  3. "Ladies and gentlemen…The Beatles!" 
That’s what Ed Sullivan famously said when he introduced America to four lads from Liverpool in February 1964. It’s also the name of the new free multimedia Beatles exhibition on display now through May 10 at The Library for the Performing Arts. Come see rare artifacts and memorabilia, take a virtual drum lesson from Ringo, and share your own Beatles remembrances in the oral history recording booth. 
Want more Beatles? Check out free Beatles-related programs and screenings coming up at The Library for the Performing Arts throughout the spring. More info at nypl.org/thebeatles 
Photo: Publicity still from A Hard Day’s Night (1964). 

    "Ladies and gentlemen…The Beatles!" 

    That’s what Ed Sullivan famously said when he introduced America to four lads from Liverpool in February 1964. It’s also the name of the new free multimedia Beatles exhibition on display now through May 10 at The Library for the Performing Arts. Come see rare artifacts and memorabilia, take a virtual drum lesson from Ringo, and share your own Beatles remembrances in the oral history recording booth. 

    Want more Beatles? Check out free Beatles-related programs and screenings coming up at The Library for the Performing Arts throughout the spring. More info at nypl.org/thebeatles 

    Photo: Publicity still from A Hard Day’s Night (1964). 

  4. Head to the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture to visit its newest exhibit, Motown: The Truth is a Hit!

    Featuring items that highlight Motown’s inimitable founder Berry Gordy and the institution’s most beloved musical acts, the multi-media showcase chronicles one of the most significant record labels in American music history. 

    Stop by the Schomburg for a musical trip down memory lane and to learn more about the iconic Motown today!

     Exhibition photos courtesy of Terrence Jennings

  5. It’s a good day to play and a great day to head over to the Schwarzman Building and enjoy our exhibition, Play Things, in the Print Gallery on the third floor. Drawing from a broad range of works in the Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Division of Art, Prints and Photographs— including stereo views, a kite, paper dolls, and visual word games—the exhibition explores the long and varied connection between art and play.

  6. I remember going into the coat room and burying my face in the jackets to cry. Last year on Facebook a woman sent me a message asking me if I was the Richard that comforted her when JFK was killed. It made me cry with both sadness and with the joy of her remembering.

    — 

    Richard K. 

    On November 22, 1963, the nation was stunned by the assassination of President John F. Kennedy. To share your story of where you (or friends and family) were during this tragic time, visit the submission form on our Facebook page. 

    Don’t miss "Dearest Jackie": On the Death of JFK, a pop-up exhibition of items from the Library’s collections, on view through December 1, 2013

  7. I was in class at Brooklyn College when someone was suddenly at the door, breathlessly uttering that the president had been shot. Everyone was stunned…and no one knew quite what to do, but we started to walk downstairs and out of Boylan Hall, flowing into the Quadrangle. Everyone was in complete shock and disbelief…and very quiet. My own private devastation took hold as I suddenly saw the flag at half staff, which meant that it really was true… and that our lives had been changed forever.

    And, they were.

    — 

    Phyllis

    On November 22, 1963, the nation was stunned by the assassination of President John F. Kennedy. To share your story of where you (or friends and family) were during this tragic time, visit the submission form on our Facebook page. 

    Don’t miss "Dearest Jackie": On the Death of JFK, a pop-up exhibition of items from the Library’s collections, on view through December 1, 2013

  8. I was only 14 at the time, and though we watched it all unfold on the unprecedented 24-hour television coverage, by the time Monday arrived, and the route of the funeral procession was made public, my parents decided that we had to drive to Washington to pay our respects. We lived nearby and parked near Arlington. Thousands of people lined the streets, but there was only silence, until the muffled drumming and then his casket passed us. Just 20 feet from where we stood. As long as I live I will never forget that day.

    — 

    Karen R.

    On November 22, 1963, the nation was stunned by the assassination of President John F. Kennedy. To share your story of where you (or friends and family) were during this tragic time, visit the submission form on our Facebook page. 

    Don’t miss "Dearest Jackie": On the Death of JFK, a pop-up exhibition of items from the Library’s collections, on view through December 1, 2013

  9. A second grader in Catholic school at the time, I vividly remember our teacher, Sister Benigna, coming back into the classroom and asking us all to stand up and pray for our fallen President Kennedy. Returning home from school, I found my mother in front of the television watching the news coverage. She could barely talk about what had happened. I watched all the coverage the next few days with my family and remember feeling such deep sadness for Mrs.Kennedy, Caroline, and John, and trying to understand why this would happen to such a beautiful family and to our country. I thought about how I had my father, a local democratic politician, hand out campaign material for Mr.Kennedy when he was running for President. I recalled praying the rosary with my my mother and siblings during the Cuban Missile Crisis, and wondering what my mother was so worried about.

    — 

    Cheryl

    On November 22, 1963, the nation was stunned by the assassination of President John F. Kennedy. To share your story of where you (or friends and family) were during this tragic time, visit the submission form on our Facebook page. 

    Don’t miss "Dearest Jackie": On the Death of JFK, a pop-up exhibition of items from the Library’s collections, on view through December 1, 2013

  10. I was a seventh grade student at Haverling School in Bath New York. I remember the principal of our school announcing on the Public Address system that President Kennedy had been shot in Texas. This was during the school day and my memories of the rest of the day were vague until I got home. My Mom was really upset and for the rest of the weekend we watched the television non-stop to hear all the details. I know that nothing else was center stage for quite a period of time up to and including his memorial when John John and Caroline were at their mother’s side. Although I was pretty young I do remember that I knew that something had changed- there would be no more innocence. By the time I understood what the reign of Camelot meant when referring to JFK and Jackie that feeling of loss would return to me. These feelings are still vivid to me today and I am about to turn 64.

    —  Maureen T.,  library user

    On November 22, 1963, the nation was stunned by the assassination of President John F. Kennedy. To share your story of where you (or friends and family) were during this tragic time, visit the submission form on our Facebook page. 

    Don’t miss "Dearest Jackie": On the Death of JFK, a pop-up exhibition of items from the Library’s collections, on view through December 1, 2013