1. Flamenco: 100 years of Flamenco in New York is a multi media exhibition located at the New York Public Library for Performing Arts opened until August 3rd. The exhibition is an integral part of the collaboration between the New York Public Library for Performing Arts and Flamenco Vivo Carlota Santana. This exhibition features artifacts documenting the history of Flamenco in New York such as film and video of performances as well as costume pieces and performance regalia. Be sure to check out this amazing exhibition before it closes in one week from tomorrow!

    Flamenco: 100 years of Flamenco in New York is a multi media exhibition located at the New York Public Library for Performing Arts opened until August 3rd. The exhibition is an integral part of the collaboration between the New York Public Library for Performing Arts and Flamenco Vivo Carlota Santana. This exhibition features artifacts documenting the history of Flamenco in New York such as film and video of performances as well as costume pieces and performance regalia. Be sure to check out this amazing exhibition before it closes in one week from tomorrow!

  2. Take a break from the heat and be sure to visit the main branch on Fifth ave and 42nd St for the final week of the free exhibit, Back Tomorrow: Federico Garcia Lorca/ Poet in New York. The exhibit closes this Saturday, July 20th! For more info click here.

    Take a break from the heat and be sure to visit the main branch on Fifth ave and 42nd St for the final week of the free exhibit, Back Tomorrow: Federico Garcia Lorca/ Poet in New York. The exhibit closes this Saturday, July 20th! For more info click here.

  3. It’s the last day to see our free exhibition Foundations of Freedom, featuring an original manuscript of the Declaration of Independence in Thomas Jefferson’s hand, and an original copy of the Bill of Rights. Over 10,000 people have seen the exhibition on the second floor of our 42nd Street library already - don’t miss it. Also, IMPORTANT - the exhibition closes at 4 p.m. today, so to ensure you are able to see it, you must be on line by 3 p.m.!!!! 

  4. In honor of this year’s Major League Baseball All-Star Game — being played in New York City — the Library is displaying its incredibly rare 1909 Honus Wagner card at our 42nd Street Library. The card — distributed by Sweet Caporal Cigarettes — is one of the rarest of all baseball cards because, as the story goes, Hall of Famer Honus Wagner asked that it be pulled from circulation because he didn’t want children buying tobacco to get his card. It is being shown on the third floor through the month of July. It’s, of course, free. Learn more about the card here, then come check it out! By the way, while you’re at 42nd Street, check out the two Major League Baseball apple statues out front, also in honor of the All-Star Game! More on that here!

    In honor of this year’s Major League Baseball All-Star Game — being played in New York City — the Library is displaying its incredibly rare 1909 Honus Wagner card at our 42nd Street Library. The card — distributed by Sweet Caporal Cigarettes — is one of the rarest of all baseball cards because, as the story goes, Hall of Famer Honus Wagner asked that it be pulled from circulation because he didn’t want children buying tobacco to get his card. It is being shown on the third floor through the month of July. It’s, of course, free. Learn more about the card here, then come check it out! By the way, while you’re at 42nd Street, check out the two Major League Baseball apple statues out front, also in honor of the All-Star Game! More on that here!

  5. A new and exciting NYPL exhibition,The ABC of It: Why Children’s Books Matter opens, tomorrow, June 21st in the Stephen A. Schwarzman Building! This exhibition examines why children’s books are important, what and how they teach children, and what they reveal about the societies that produced them. It features more than 200 items from the Library’s collections including: Where the Wild Things Are, Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland, Charlotte’s Web, Goodnight Moon, and many others.  Be sure to visit The ABC Of It and see some of your favorite children’s books! Visit the NYPL site for more details. 

  6. In Mid-Manhattan’s exhibition, Reading Room, there is a photo of NYPL’s Riverdale Library. It look like a little ski chalet in the Alps! But, there is one thing… or actually two things missing in this photo taken during the winter months. Just this past April Riverdale received two lion statues courtesy of Loews Regency Hotel and the ski chalet branch held a naming contest, judged by NYPL’s President Tony Marx. He selected the very appropriate River (left) and Dale (right). 
Continue to support branches like Riverdale and visit www.nypl.org/speakout!

    In Mid-Manhattan’s exhibition, Reading Room, there is a photo of NYPL’s Riverdale Library. It look like a little ski chalet in the Alps! But, there is one thing… or actually two things missing in this photo taken during the winter months. Just this past April Riverdale received two lion statues courtesy of Loews Regency Hotel and the ski chalet branch held a naming contest, judged by NYPL’s President Tony Marx. He selected the very appropriate River (left) and Dale (right). 

    Continue to support branches like Riverdale and visit www.nypl.org/speakout!

  7. We have one more week until Halloween, so what better way to celebrate than with this picture of a screaming spool by local artist Ner Beck? You can visit this photograph at Grand Central Library’s current exhibition of Mr. Beck’s work, which contains a plethora of inspiring images of objects and displays found during his daily walks in neighborhoods throughout the city.  
We think you’ll be inspired to discover your own interesting images on your journeys about town! But, first take a stroll down to Grand Central Library!

    We have one more week until Halloween, so what better way to celebrate than with this picture of a screaming spool by local artist Ner Beck? You can visit this photograph at Grand Central Library’s current exhibition of Mr. Beck’s work, which contains a plethora of inspiring images of objects and displays found during his daily walks in neighborhoods throughout the city.  

    We think you’ll be inspired to discover your own interesting images on your journeys about town! But, first take a stroll down to Grand Central Library!


  8. On this beautiful Friday, we suggest you take a leisurely stroll down (or up) Fifth Avenue. Walk up the stairs of the Stephen A. Schwarzman Building. Enter through the gorgeous doors and walk toward the end of Astor Hall. Turn left and you will see the majestic red curtain beckoning you to enter the Library’s new exhibition Charles Dickens: The Key to Character, where you can  imagine yourself transported back to Dickens time and learn about his inspirations and how he inspired others. 
Happy Flashback Friday!
(Image: J. R. Brown. “Dickens Surrounded by His Characters.” Engraving from Charles Dickens by Pen and Pencil, by Frederic G. Kitton (London: F. T. Sabin, 1890). NYPL, General Research Division.)

    On this beautiful Friday, we suggest you take a leisurely stroll down (or up) Fifth Avenue. Walk up the stairs of the Stephen A. Schwarzman Building. Enter through the gorgeous doors and walk toward the end of Astor Hall. Turn left and you will see the majestic red curtain beckoning you to enter the Library’s new exhibition Charles Dickens: The Key to Character, where you can  imagine yourself transported back to Dickens time and learn about his inspirations and how he inspired others. 

    Happy Flashback Friday!

    (Image: J. R. Brown. “Dickens Surrounded by His Characters.” Engraving from Charles Dickens by Pen and Pencil, by Frederic G. Kitton (London: F. T. Sabin, 1890). NYPL, General Research Division.)

  9. Lunch Hour NYC, the NYPL’s newest exhibition, opens on Friday!! Watch the video to learn more!

  10. John Milisenda’s photographs of Manhattan’s Lower East Side during the 1960s will be on display at the Grand Central Library through June 20.

    His photos are a candid portrait of everyday experiences, balanced between romanticism and mean streets. Many of these images were made when he was a teenager and even before he studied art at the Pratt Institute.

    John Milisenda lives in Brooklyn. His work is in the collections of the Museum of Modern Art, the Bibliothèque nationale de France, and the Brooklyn Museum, among others.