1. Before he was the star of How I Met Your Mother, Josh Radnor was a student at the Eugene O’Neill Theater Center's National Theater Institute. Radnor will be at The Library for the Performing Arts tomorrow (June 19) for a conversation with Donna Dinovelli (NTI faculty) and Rachel Jett (NTI Artistic Director) about NTI’s impact and legacy. More info on the free event here, and more about The Library for the Performing Arts’ exhibition celebrating the O’Neill Theater Center’s 50th anniversary here.

    Before he was the star of How I Met Your Mother, Josh Radnor was a student at the Eugene O’Neill Theater Center's National Theater Institute. Radnor will be at The Library for the Performing Arts tomorrow (June 19) for a conversation with Donna Dinovelli (NTI faculty) and Rachel Jett (NTI Artistic Director) about NTI’s impact and legacy. More info on the free event here, and more about The Library for the Performing Arts’ exhibition celebrating the O’Neill Theater Center’s 50th anniversary here.

  2. Tony award-winning actor Alan Cumming is many things, but typical he is not. Nor is he a cheese. So when he comes to The Library for the Performing Arts next month, don’t expect a typical talk about the acting process. (That’s why the title of the event is "I Am Not a Cheese; I Do Not Have a Process": Alan Cumming on Acting.)
A portion of the seats for the June 23 event are now available for advance reservation online. And don’t worry: if you can’t scoop up an advance ticket, the remaining seats will be distributed on a first come, first served basis the day of the event. We recommend arriving early. Click here for more info. 

    Tony award-winning actor Alan Cumming is many things, but typical he is not. Nor is he a cheese. So when he comes to The Library for the Performing Arts next month, don’t expect a typical talk about the acting process. (That’s why the title of the event is "I Am Not a Cheese; I Do Not Have a Process": Alan Cumming on Acting.)

    A portion of the seats for the June 23 event are now available for advance reservation online. And don’t worry: if you can’t scoop up an advance ticket, the remaining seats will be distributed on a first come, first served basis the day of the event. We recommend arriving early. Click here for more info. 

  3. Love kids’ books? Love discussing them, reading them and sharing them with others, including your kids? Take a listen to this great appearance by our Youth Materials Coordinator Elizabeth Bird on WNYC’s Leonard Lopate Show yesterday. She talked about a whole host of fun stuff, from her favorite stories to why books become classics. So listen and enjoy! And while you’re at it, check out the Library’s list of the top 100 children’s books of the last 100 years, and plan a trip to our 42nd Street Library to see the free, critically-acclaimed exhibition The ABC Of It: Why Children’s Books Matter. It’s open until Sept. 7, and it’s pretty darn amazing (just ask The New York Times). 

    Love kids’ books? Love discussing them, reading them and sharing them with others, including your kids? Take a listen to this great appearance by our Youth Materials Coordinator Elizabeth Bird on WNYC’s Leonard Lopate Show yesterday. She talked about a whole host of fun stuff, from her favorite stories to why books become classics. So listen and enjoy! And while you’re at it, check out the Library’s list of the top 100 children’s books of the last 100 years, and plan a trip to our 42nd Street Library to see the free, critically-acclaimed exhibition The ABC Of It: Why Children’s Books MatterIt’s open until Sept. 7, and it’s pretty darn amazing (just ask The New York Times). 

  4. The New York Public Library is partnering with World Book Night to celebrate the wonderful world of reading. During the worldwide event, taking place on Shakespeare’s birthday on April 23, authors and 25,000 volunteers participating in World Book Night U.S. give away books to people who don’t regularly read or don’t have access to printed books.
The New York Public Library will be hosting an author event in honor of the special day on Tuesday, April 22nd, at the Stephen A. Schwarzman Building in the Edna Barnes Salomon Room located on the third floor. Listen to the group of acclaimed authors that will be discussing their love of books and libraries. They include Malcolm Gladwell, Garrison Keillor, Walter Dean Myers, Tobias Wolff, and Esmeralda Santiago among others. 

    The New York Public Library is partnering with World Book Night to celebrate the wonderful world of reading. During the worldwide event, taking place on Shakespeare’s birthday on April 23, authors and 25,000 volunteers participating in World Book Night U.S. give away books to people who don’t regularly read or don’t have access to printed books.

    The New York Public Library will be hosting an author event in honor of the special day on Tuesday, April 22nd, at the Stephen A. Schwarzman Building in the Edna Barnes Salomon Room located on the third floor. Listen to the group of acclaimed authors that will be discussing their love of books and libraries. They include Malcolm GladwellGarrison Keillor, Walter Dean MyersTobias Wolff, and Esmeralda Santiago among others. 

  5. Let’s play! There are only a couple days left to enjoy Play Things: 600 Years of Games and Other Merriments, an exhibition that explores the long and varied tradition of how works on paper not only participated in but actively facilitated conditions of playfulness. From early paper dolls, to kites, word games, photos, and optical illusions, the exhibition invites you to literally play and interact with some materials, and engage with other artifacts in a more figuratively playful way. 
Play Things is on display through Sunday, March 16 in the Stephen A. Schwarzman Building’s Print and Stokes Gallery. 

    Let’s play! There are only a couple days left to enjoy Play Things: 600 Years of Games and Other Merriments, an exhibition that explores the long and varied tradition of how works on paper not only participated in but actively facilitated conditions of playfulness. From early paper dolls, to kites, word games, photos, and optical illusions, the exhibition invites you to literally play and interact with some materials, and engage with other artifacts in a more figuratively playful way. 

    Play Things is on display through Sunday, March 16 in the Stephen A. Schwarzman Building’s Print and Stokes Gallery

  6. For those of you interested in great 1970’s films or the world of television do we have an awesome free event tonight at The New York Public Library for the Performing Arts at 6:00pm in the Bruno Walter Auditorium. The New York Times Culture Reporter Dave Itzkoff stops by to discuss his latest book MAD AS HELL: THE MAKING OF NETWORK AND THE FATEFUL VISION OF THE ANGRIEST MAN IN MOVIES. Dave is no stranger to The Library for the Performing Arts as he researched much of his book by using the Paddy Chayefsky Papers that can be found within The Billy Rose Theatre Division. You can also read an article Dave wrote about the collection for The Times from 2011 here. 

    For those of you interested in great 1970’s films or the world of television do we have an awesome free event tonight at The New York Public Library for the Performing Arts at 6:00pm in the Bruno Walter Auditorium. The New York Times Culture Reporter Dave Itzkoff stops by to discuss his latest book MAD AS HELL: THE MAKING OF NETWORK AND THE FATEFUL VISION OF THE ANGRIEST MAN IN MOVIES. Dave is no stranger to The Library for the Performing Arts as he researched much of his book by using the Paddy Chayefsky Papers that can be found within The Billy Rose Theatre Division. You can also read an article Dave wrote about the collection for The Times from 2011 here

  7. It’s World Read Aloud Day! You can celebrate with us this afternoon at the Jefferson Market Library where there will be crafts, performances, and (of course) readings from very special guests author Jacqueline Woodson and NYC Police Commissioner William Bratton! 
See you there!

    It’s World Read Aloud Day! You can celebrate with us this afternoon at the Jefferson Market Library where there will be crafts, performances, and (of course) readings from very special guests author Jacqueline Woodson and NYC Police Commissioner William Bratton! 

    See you there!

  8. Here is something for you to do during your lunch break - NYPL kicks off an awesome new author series today. Free and open to the public, NYPL BOOKS AT NOON will take place every Wednesday at noon, from March 5 through May 7. What makes this series so cool is it takes place under the center arch in historic Astor Hall! 
Programs will last a half-hour with the opportunity for attendees to ask questions. The event is standing room only, so don’t think about it too much and just come on over. The series kicks off with acclaimed author and famed WAIT WAIT… DON’T TELL ME panelist - P.J. O’Rourke. 
See you soon!  

    Here is something for you to do during your lunch break - NYPL kicks off an awesome new author series today. Free and open to the public, NYPL BOOKS AT NOON will take place every Wednesday at noon, from March 5 through May 7. What makes this series so cool is it takes place under the center arch in historic Astor Hall

    Programs will last a half-hour with the opportunity for attendees to ask questions. The event is standing room only, so don’t think about it too much and just come on over. The series kicks off with acclaimed author and famed WAIT WAIT… DON’T TELL ME panelist - P.J. O’Rourke

    See you soon!  

  9. "Ladies and gentlemen…The Beatles!" 
That’s what Ed Sullivan famously said when he introduced America to four lads from Liverpool in February 1964. It’s also the name of the new free multimedia Beatles exhibition on display now through May 10 at The Library for the Performing Arts. Come see rare artifacts and memorabilia, take a virtual drum lesson from Ringo, and share your own Beatles remembrances in the oral history recording booth. 
Want more Beatles? Check out free Beatles-related programs and screenings coming up at The Library for the Performing Arts throughout the spring. More info at nypl.org/thebeatles 
Photo: Publicity still from A Hard Day’s Night (1964). 

    "Ladies and gentlemen…The Beatles!" 

    That’s what Ed Sullivan famously said when he introduced America to four lads from Liverpool in February 1964. It’s also the name of the new free multimedia Beatles exhibition on display now through May 10 at The Library for the Performing Arts. Come see rare artifacts and memorabilia, take a virtual drum lesson from Ringo, and share your own Beatles remembrances in the oral history recording booth. 

    Want more Beatles? Check out free Beatles-related programs and screenings coming up at The Library for the Performing Arts throughout the spring. More info at nypl.org/thebeatles 

    Photo: Publicity still from A Hard Day’s Night (1964). 

  10. Tonight at 7pmat The NYPL’s Stephen A. Schwarzman Building we will have the special free program HOW TO ACT UP. Learn the nuts and bolts of grassroots political activism from current and former members of the historic AIDS advocacy group ACT UP. Veteran activists will share their experience with outreach, planning demonstrations, working with media, and civil disobedience. To attend you can register online or e-mail Jason Baumann at JasonBaumann@nypl.org
This program is in conjunction with the fantastic exhibition WHY WE FIGHT: REMEMBERING AIDS ACTIVISM currently on display through April 6 at the Schwarzman Building. 

    Tonight at 7pmat The NYPL’s Stephen A. Schwarzman Building we will have the special free program HOW TO ACT UP. Learn the nuts and bolts of grassroots political activism from current and former members of the historic AIDS advocacy group ACT UP. Veteran activists will share their experience with outreach, planning demonstrations, working with media, and civil disobedience. To attend you can register online or e-mail Jason Baumann at JasonBaumann@nypl.org

    This program is in conjunction with the fantastic exhibition WHY WE FIGHT: REMEMBERING AIDS ACTIVISM currently on display through April 6 at the Schwarzman Building.