1. Join us tomorrow at Mid-Manhattan Library when artist Liz Sales and internationally renowned photographer Adam Fuss discuss awakening nineteenth-century photographic traditions as a means of  rediscovering photography as well as the work Sales created for her site-specific exhibitions The Eye’s Mind as part of Photo Walls in Picture Collectionand Art in the Windowsexhibition series.

    Examples of Liz Sales nineteenth-century photographic traditions included here. Gorgeous, aren’t they?

  2. Today’s Caturday offering gives you three felines for the price of one (the price, as with everything at the Library, is, of course, free). This is a 1907 book illustration from our Mid-Manhattan Picture Collection by the one and only Beatrix Potter - who will be featured in an upcoming, amazing, free exhibition at the Library called The ABC of It: Why Children’s Books Matter. It will open to the pubic on Friday, June 21 - be sure to come to our 42nd Street Library and check it out. A Beatrix Potter drawing will be in the show, along with recordings of E.B. White reading excerpts of Charlotte’s Web, a manuscript of The Secret Garden, the copy of Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland that Lewis Carroll gave to the woman who inspired the character, and much, much more. The exhibition explores children’s literature and why it has been - and continues to be - so important to individuals, and to society as a whole. So mark your calendars to June 21 - and happy Caturday!

    Today’s Caturday offering gives you three felines for the price of one (the price, as with everything at the Library, is, of course, free). This is a 1907 book illustration from our Mid-Manhattan Picture Collection by the one and only Beatrix Potter - who will be featured in an upcoming, amazing, free exhibition at the Library called The ABC of It: Why Children’s Books Matter. It will open to the pubic on Friday, June 21 - be sure to come to our 42nd Street Library and check it out. A Beatrix Potter drawing will be in the show, along with recordings of E.B. White reading excerpts of Charlotte’s Web, a manuscript of The Secret Garden, the copy of Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland that Lewis Carroll gave to the woman who inspired the character, and much, much more. The exhibition explores children’s literature and why it has been - and continues to be - so important to individuals, and to society as a whole. So mark your calendars to June 21 - and happy Caturday!

  3. Join NYPL on March 12 for a fascinating conversation with Deborah Martin Kao and Gary Schneider and catch a glimpse of Schneider’s Portrait Sequences 1975—a series of works that transforms how we see the human body. 
"In 1975 I began working on a film that looked at the body and face in close-up. I used a still camera to storyboard and soon realized that the sequences did not need to be made into a film. When exhibited they comprised as few as one image and as many as sixteen. Unlike cinematic linear progression these sequences could be read from left to right or the reverse or episodically. It was factual as well as metaphorical, and also dealt with a private exchange between my subject and myself, that could then be made public. These remain essential aspects of my work…"
—Gary Schneider

    Join NYPL on March 12 for a fascinating conversation with Deborah Martin Kao and Gary Schneider and catch a glimpse of Schneider’s Portrait Sequences 1975—a series of works that transforms how we see the human body. 

    "In 1975 I began working on a film that looked at the body and face in close-up. I used a still camera to storyboard and soon realized that the sequences did not need to be made into a film. When exhibited they comprised as few as one image and as many as sixteen. Unlike cinematic linear progression these sequences could be read from left to right or the reverse or episodically. It was factual as well as metaphorical, and also dealt with a private exchange between my subject and myself, that could then be made public. These remain essential aspects of my work…"

    —Gary Schneider

  4. It’s a crooked Caturday! This drawing from the late 1800s originally ran in a book of nursery rhymes, and is now in our Mid-Manhattan Picture Collection. It illustrates a story about a crooked man, with crooked furniture,  a crooked window, and, of course, a crooked cat. It’s perfectly weird - happy Caturday! By the way, speaking of twisting one’s body into crooked positions, did you know NYPL offers totally free yoga classes in its branches? The Riverdale Press just highlighted one of the programs - but there are many others throughout our system. So search through our offerings to find a class, then drop by to work out your mind AND your body! See you soon, and spread the word!

    It’s a crooked Caturday! This drawing from the late 1800s originally ran in a book of nursery rhymes, and is now in our Mid-Manhattan Picture Collection. It illustrates a story about a crooked man, with crooked furniture,  a crooked window, and, of course, a crooked cat. It’s perfectly weird - happy Caturday! By the way, speaking of twisting one’s body into crooked positions, did you know NYPL offers totally free yoga classes in its branches? The Riverdale Press just highlighted one of the programs - but there are many others throughout our system. So search through our offerings to find a class, then drop by to work out your mind AND your body! See you soon, and spread the word!

  5. Nathan Englander Likes Donuts

    • Nathan Englander was once described as “Isaac Bashevis Singer on crack.”
    • Nathan Englander also has a penchant for donuts from Brooklyn donut-ery Donut.
    • And Nathan Englander reads Gawker, occasionally. 

    How do we know these things? The L Magazine has posted their fantastic Q&A with Mr. Englander in celebration of his new play, The 27th Man. 

    And lucky you - tomorrow night Nathan Englander and Director of The 27th Man, Barry Edelstein visit NYPL

    (*donuts will not be provided)

  6. All art should become science, and all science should become art.

    — 

    Friedrich Schlengel, 18th Century German Scholar

    Courtesy of John Tresch’s THE ROMANTIC MACHINE, the subject of this Thursday’s Conversations at the Cullman Center event with the author and Ian Buruma. 

  7. NYPL - The place to be tonight

    If you’re looking for a captivating way to enjoy the beautiful evening tonight, we have two events at The New York Public Library that are sure to inspire: 

    At 6pm, renowned artist William Wegman discusses his stunning new book Hello Nature: How to Draw, Paint, Cook, and Find Your Way. He explores the unique artistic vision behind his work and his highly acclaimed career. He is joined by award-winning author Padgett Powell, whose fiction work also appears in the book, for a conversation, audience Q&A, and book signing. 

    Meanwhile, at Bryant Park, behind the Stephen A. Schwarzman Building Creative Time & LIVE from the NYPL present THE LAST PICTURES at 7pm:

    Trevor Paglen

    Join artist and geographer Trevor Paglen, filmmaker Werner Herzog, and Pulitzer Prize-winning poet Tracy K. Smith for a special evening under the stars in New York’s Bryant Park.  This event, co-presented by Creative Time and LIVE from the NYPL, will feature a reading by Smith; Herzog and Paglen in conversation about cultural artifacts, space exploration, and the legacy of human civilization; and a presentation of the images included in The Last Pictures—a golden disc of images created by Paglen, to be launched into outer space attached to the exterior of communications satellite EchoStar XVI. Telescopes will also be provided for viewing the night sky by the Amateur Astronomers Association of New York. The event is free and open to the public on a first-come, first-served basis.

  8. The Art of Defining Art →

    Bard College President Leon Botstein shares his thoughts on art! Don’t miss his Floating University presentation about the topic tomorrow night at the Stephen A. Schwarzman building. 

  9. Check out “Wikipedia, The Musical!”

    Looking for something to do tomorrow (Saturday, Oct. 22)? Head to our Library for the Performing Arts anytime between noon and 6 pm and use our collections to help edit Wikipedia pages for musicals and theater music. This all-day “editathon” - called “Wikipedia, The Musical!” - is a partnership between NYPL and Wikipedia, and you can read more about it in the NY Times. Participants require ZERO experience with Wikipedia, so come on down!