1. It’s been a particularly sad week in the world of entertainment - yesterday we lost another star, Lauren Bacall. In addition to a long career as an award-winning actress, she also won the National Book Award for her autobiography By Myself in 1980. We’re honoring her legacy with a compilation of her work on and off the screen. You can also view some rare images of the actress in our digital collection.

    It’s been a particularly sad week in the world of entertainment - yesterday we lost another star, Lauren Bacall. In addition to a long career as an award-winning actress, she also won the National Book Award for her autobiography By Myself in 1980. We’re honoring her legacy with a compilation of her work on and off the screen. You can also view some rare images of the actress in our digital collection.

  2. NYPL is bringing reading to the streets! Starting Tuesday, we’re opening an outdoor reading room on the plaza of the 42nd Street Library on Fifth Avenue. We welcome you to visit, enjoy reading our staff picks, and take a photo in front of a backdrop of the Rose Main Reading Room!This isn’t the first time we’ve brought the library outside. In the summer of 1935, NYPL created an open-air reading room in Bryant Park so that patrons could enjoy their selections in the sun and fresh air! #ireadeverywhere

    NYPL is bringing reading to the streets! Starting Tuesday, we’re opening an outdoor reading room on the plaza of the 42nd Street Library on Fifth Avenue. We welcome you to visit, enjoy reading our staff picks, and take a photo in front of a backdrop of the Rose Main Reading Room!

    This isn’t the first time we’ve brought the library outside. In the summer of 1935, NYPL created an open-air reading room in Bryant Park so that patrons could enjoy their selections in the sun and fresh air! #ireadeverywhere

  3. This note was found on the back of a letter from birthday boy Herman Melville to Nathaniel Hawthorne. It reads: “If you find any sand in this letter, regard it as so many sands of my life, which run out as I was writing it.” You can see the full letter here,  complete with writing advice and other gems like “…I shall lay eyes on you one of these days however. Keep some Champagne or Gin for me.” Happy Birthday Herman Melville!

    This note was found on the back of a letter from birthday boy Herman Melville to Nathaniel Hawthorne. It reads: “If you find any sand in this letter, regard it as so many sands of my life, which run out as I was writing it.” You can see the full letter here,  complete with writing advice and other gems like “…I shall lay eyes on you one of these days however. Keep some Champagne or Gin for me.” Happy Birthday Herman Melville!

  4. Today marks the 100th anniversary of the start of World War I and the opening of the Library’s latest exhibition, Over Here: WWI and the Fight for the American Mind.  WWI was a tense time in America with pacifists and war supporters fighting for public opinion on whether the US should go to war. The iconic American symbol, Uncle Sam, was born and Teddy Roosevelt was debating with noted pacifist Jane Addams; The Espionage Act was created and war-time ballads were composed. 
Learn more about this dramatic time in American history at the Stephen A. Schwarzman Building and see historic artifacts that bring the homefront to life!

    Today marks the 100th anniversary of the start of World War I and the opening of the Library’s latest exhibition, Over Here: WWI and the Fight for the American Mind.  WWI was a tense time in America with pacifists and war supporters fighting for public opinion on whether the US should go to war. The iconic American symbol, Uncle Sam, was born and Teddy Roosevelt was debating with noted pacifist Jane Addams; The Espionage Act was created and war-time ballads were composed. 

    Learn more about this dramatic time in American history at the Stephen A. Schwarzman Building and see historic artifacts that bring the homefront to life!

  5. We are deeply saddened to hear of the loss of Emmy and Tony Award winning actress Elaine Stritch, whose acerbic personality and memorable stage and screen performances have captured hearts for decades. This 1954 promotional photo from our Billy Rose Theatre Division features Stritch as Peggy Porterfield in a revival of “On Your Toes,” and captures her personalty perfectly. Learn more about the American Theater Hall of Famer by checking out materials from your local NYPL branch.  

    We are deeply saddened to hear of the loss of Emmy and Tony Award winning actress Elaine Stritch, whose acerbic personality and memorable stage and screen performances have captured hearts for decades. This 1954 promotional photo from our Billy Rose Theatre Division features Stritch as Peggy Porterfield in a revival of “On Your Toes,” and captures her personalty perfectly. Learn more about the American Theater Hall of Famer by checking out materials from your local NYPL branch.  

  6. Happy Bastille Day! We found a great photo in our Digital Collection showing a Bastille Day celebration at the Statue of Liberty in 1936. Celebrate this French holiday by perusing through some more great Bastille Day images from our collection (and maybe enjoy a croissant or two!) 

    Happy Bastille Day! We found a great photo in our Digital Collection showing a Bastille Day celebration at the Statue of Liberty in 1936. Celebrate this French holiday by perusing through some more great Bastille Day images from our collection (and maybe enjoy a croissant or two!) 

  7. Manhattanhenge is back tonight - where the sun aligns perfectly with Manhattan’s streets. Check out this article about our city’s famous grid design while you prep for sunset! Get those instagramming fingers ready!

    Manhattanhenge is back tonight - where the sun aligns perfectly with Manhattan’s streets. Check out this article about our city’s famous grid design while you prep for sunset! Get those instagramming fingers ready!

  8. To Kill a Mockingbird was published on this day in 1960, which is a wonderful reason to go back and reread this treasured novel. Use our Reader’s Den discussion questions to take a new look at an old favorite. 

    To Kill a Mockingbird was published on this day in 1960, which is a wonderful reason to go back and reread this treasured novel. Use our Reader’s Den discussion questions to take a new look at an old favorite. 

  9. This 1928 NYPL overdue book slip was miraculously discovered in the 1980s during the construction of the Tenement Museum. The Museum kept the card on display, stating that the title of the book on the card is “one of the great mysteries, we unfortunately do not know.” That is, until yesterday, when the Museum turned to Twitter for help deciphering the handwriting. Within a few hours, the mystery was solved. The book, which may have never been returned, was Israel by by Ludwig Lewisohn. A great example of the power of social media.

  10. Today is the 200th anniversary of Walter Scott’s book Waverley - the first historical novel in the English language. Waverley was a hugely popular and influential novel, and Scott went on to write a series of historical works. We’ve compiled a selection of his writing for you to enjoy. 

    Today is the 200th anniversary of Walter Scott’s book Waverley - the first historical novel in the English language. Waverley was a hugely popular and influential novel, and Scott went on to write a series of historical works. We’ve compiled a selection of his writing for you to enjoy.