1. A happy 50th Anniversary to the 1964 World’s Fair! Check out the Library’s collection of photographs from the celebrated event. (and the awesome fashions, Mad Men fans eat your heart out!

  2. Live All You Can: Henry James in the Village →

    Happy Birthday Henry James! 

  3. Today is the Fort Washington Library’s 100th birthday! NYPL and friends had a great day on Saturday celebrating the centennial of the Fort Washington Library. We look forward to the next 100 years!

    Today is the Fort Washington Library’s 100th birthday! NYPL and friends had a great day on Saturday celebrating the centennial of the Fort Washington Library. We look forward to the next 100 years!

  4. The technology known as television experience a great advancement on this day in 1927, when the first long-distance public broadcast was made with President Herbert Hoover. Since then, those with a creative futuristic bent had grand plans for the medium. The Library’s George Arents Cigarette card collection features a card from Max Cigarettes, which predicted that people would watch TV underwater or capturing the news as it happens. 

    The technology known as television experience a great advancement on this day in 1927, when the first long-distance public broadcast was made with President Herbert Hoover. Since then, those with a creative futuristic bent had grand plans for the medium. The Library’s George Arents Cigarette card collection features a card from Max Cigarettes, which predicted that people would watch TV underwater or capturing the news as it happens. 

  5. Happy Birthday Harry Houdini! Did you know that Mr. Houdini was a fan of the Library? On August 31, 1911 the acclaimed magician sent NYPL’s first president John Shaw Billings a letter offering two bound sets of The Conjurer’s Magazine, two books on handcuffs published in Russia and Germany, and his assistance on the subject of “Magic and Mystery” should the Library need it. 
Today the Library has the archive of the Society of American Magicians, of which Harry Houdini was President. Now everyone can have his assistance on the subject of magic and mystery!
 

    Happy Birthday Harry Houdini! Did you know that Mr. Houdini was a fan of the Library? On August 31, 1911 the acclaimed magician sent NYPL’s first president John Shaw Billings a letter offering two bound sets of The Conjurer’s Magazine, two books on handcuffs published in Russia and Germany, and his assistance on the subject of “Magic and Mystery” should the Library need it. 

    Today the Library has the archive of the Society of American Magicians, of which Harry Houdini was President. Now everyone can have his assistance on the subject of magic and mystery!

     

  6. In honor of the newly-arrived Spring, and our fervent hope for warmer weather, today’s Caturday from NYPL’s 1939 World’s Fair Collection features a magnolia blossom and two extraordinarily tiny kittens.

    In honor of the newly-arrived Spring, and our fervent hope for warmer weather, today’s Caturday from NYPL’s 1939 World’s Fair Collection features a magnolia blossom and two extraordinarily tiny kittens.

  7. You might be curious to know what Nathaniel Hawthorne’s children were doing on March 19, 1848 and if you were curious to know what Nathaniel Hawthorne’s children were doing on March 19, 1848, we are happy to share the following missive from NYPL’s Berg Collection drafted in both Sophie and Una Hawthornes’ hands: 
Julian is dressed in a little knit woolen jacket, bordered and girdled with purple and scarlet- a check gown underneath - knit gaiters on his short legs - one leather shoe and one of cloth, embroidered. His hair has just been curled for the curls dressed by Dora, so that it looks not unlike an old fashioned wig, as to primness and formality. He is now clamboring into a chair beside me - up and down - two or three times a minute, talking about various matters, and expressing, sometimes in one word, what might be elaborated into sentences…. 
To learn more about the Hawthorne family from their personal reminsices visit NYPL’s Digital Collections website where the journals are available for viewing.

    You might be curious to know what Nathaniel Hawthorne’s children were doing on March 19, 1848 and if you were curious to know what Nathaniel Hawthorne’s children were doing on March 19, 1848, we are happy to share the following missive from NYPL’s Berg Collection drafted in both Sophie and Una Hawthornes’ hands: 

    Julian is dressed in a little knit woolen jacket, bordered and girdled with purple and scarlet- a check gown underneath - knit gaiters on his short legs - one leather shoe and one of cloth, embroidered. His hair has just been curled for the curls dressed by Dora, so that it looks not unlike an old fashioned wig, as to primness and formality. He is now clamboring into a chair beside me - up and down - two or three times a minute, talking about various matters, and expressing, sometimes in one word, what might be elaborated into sentences…. 

    To learn more about the Hawthorne family from their personal reminsices visit NYPL’s Digital Collections website where the journals are available for viewing.

  8. In honor of National Pi Day yesterday, today’s Caturday image from the Mid-Manhattan Picture Collection seemed appropos. This dainty picture featuring an enormous pie is from an ABC Book in the 1910s. 
If you haven’t eaten a piece of  pi pie,yet, take a page (this page in particular) from the book and Eat It.

    In honor of National Pi Day yesterday, today’s Caturday image from the Mid-Manhattan Picture Collection seemed appropos. This dainty picture featuring an enormous pie is from an ABC Book in the 1910s. 

    If you haven’t eaten a piece of  pi pie,yet, take a page (this page in particular) from the book and Eat It.

  9. Interesting historical note in today’s US history. It was on this date, March 13, in the year 1639 that the great Harvard College is named after the clergyman John Harvard. While plenty has changed since 1639 - including the school’s name now known as Harvard University - the Harvard name is still around. You can check out all the books you want about John Harvard and what is now Harvard University at various branches of The New York Public Library.  

    Interesting historical note in today’s US history. It was on this date, March 13, in the year 1639 that the great Harvard College is named after the clergyman John Harvard. While plenty has changed since 1639 - including the school’s name now known as Harvard University - the Harvard name is still around. You can check out all the books you want about John Harvard and what is now Harvard University at various branches of The New York Public Library.  

  10. The image above from NYPL’s Rare Books Division is a fragment of Walt Whitman’s revision of his poem “The Mississippi at Midnight,” which was first published on this day in 1848 in the New Orleans Daily Crescent. 
(H/T to Book Pilgrim for sharing the poem on the Walt Whitman Archive, the finished text can be read here.)

    The image above from NYPL’s Rare Books Division is a fragment of Walt Whitman’s revision of his poem “The Mississippi at Midnight,” which was first published on this day in 1848 in the New Orleans Daily Crescent. 

    (H/T to Book Pilgrim for sharing the poem on the Walt Whitman Archive, the finished text can be read here.)