1. Not sure what’s best about this Times’ T Magazine feature on authors and the rooms where they write: the photos, or what the writers have to say about their spaces. Pictured above is Jesmyn Ward, author of Salvage the Bones and the memoir Men We Reaped, and upcoming LIVE from the NYPL guest. “I don’t understand why the rest of my house is fairly spartan,” she says, “and yet the room I intend to write in is burdened by everything I need to do one day.” The rest of what she has to say about her space is a mini masterpiece. Read it - along with what Jonathan Lethem, Julian Barnes, Jhumpa Lahiri, Edwidge Danticat, and Richard Dawkins have to say about their spaces - here.

    Not sure what’s best about this Times’ T Magazine feature on authors and the rooms where they write: the photos, or what the writers have to say about their spaces. Pictured above is Jesmyn Ward, author of Salvage the Bones and the memoir Men We Reaped, and upcoming LIVE from the NYPL guest. “I don’t understand why the rest of my house is fairly spartan,” she says, “and yet the room I intend to write in is burdened by everything I need to do one day.” The rest of what she has to say about her space is a mini masterpiece. Read it - along with what Jonathan Lethem, Julian Barnes, Jhumpa Lahiri, Edwidge Danticat, and Richard Dawkins have to say about their spaces - here.

  2. Now this is a cute picture (and we ain’t “lion.” Get it? Ha ha ha ha). These adorable little library lovers are showing some love to one of The New York Public Library’s newest additions -  two lion statues, donated by the Loews Regency Hotel, who will stand guard outside of our Riverdale Branch in the Bronx. We had a naming contest for the two “cubs” (who are, of course, reminiscent of our two famous lions Patience and Fortitude on 42nd Street) and we received over 300 submissions from all over the globe. The winning names, as chosen by our president Tony Marx and reported in The New York Times? River and Dale. “It was difficult to choose from such a wide range of creative names, but after looking over the finalists with much patience and fortitude, I couldn’t help but name the lions after their new home, a vibrant community with dedicated patrons,” Tony said. So welcome, River and Dale. And happy Caturday!!

    Now this is a cute picture (and we ain’t “lion.” Get it? Ha ha ha ha). These adorable little library lovers are showing some love to one of The New York Public Library’s newest additions -  two lion statues, donated by the Loews Regency Hotel, who will stand guard outside of our Riverdale Branch in the Bronx. We had a naming contest for the two “cubs” (who are, of course, reminiscent of our two famous lions Patience and Fortitude on 42nd Street) and we received over 300 submissions from all over the globe. The winning names, as chosen by our president Tony Marx and reported in The New York Times? River and Dale. “It was difficult to choose from such a wide range of creative names, but after looking over the finalists with much patience and fortitude, I couldn’t help but name the lions after their new home, a vibrant community with dedicated patrons,” Tony said. So welcome, River and Dale. And happy Caturday!!

  3. darienlibrary:

Mr. Ferguson culls movies for the LES Heritage Film Series from more than 6,000 titles of rare 16-millimeter films that form the core of the Reserve Film and Video collection at the New York Public Library for the Performing Arts, in Lincoln Center Plaza.
The collection focuses on independently produced works, including animations, experimental films and documentaries, and anyone with a New York Public Library card can reserve and check out 16-millimeter films, many of which are rare artworks.
“Sean has mined the collection for films that really speak of the area — historically and aesthetically — and bring together the Seward Park community,” David Callahan, the principal librarian of the Reserve Film and Video collection, said in an e-mail. “He’s selected a range of films made over decades that reflect the film collection’s composition — documentaries, feature films and experimental works.”
(via Film Series Covers a Century of the Lower East Side - NYTimes.com)
Filed under: library program inspiration

    darienlibrary:

    Mr. Ferguson culls movies for the LES Heritage Film Series from more than 6,000 titles of rare 16-millimeter films that form the core of the Reserve Film and Video collection at the New York Public Library for the Performing Arts, in Lincoln Center Plaza.

    The collection focuses on independently produced works, including animations, experimental films and documentaries, and anyone with a New York Public Library card can reserve and check out 16-millimeter films, many of which are rare artworks.

    “Sean has mined the collection for films that really speak of the area — historically and aesthetically — and bring together the Seward Park community,” David Callahan, the principal librarian of the Reserve Film and Video collection, said in an e-mail. “He’s selected a range of films made over decades that reflect the film collection’s composition — documentaries, feature films and experimental works.”

    (via Film Series Covers a Century of the Lower East Side - NYTimes.com)

    Filed under: library program inspiration

  4. On March 8, 1877, in the Church of St. Francis Xavier on 16th Street, “the shriek of an hysterical woman in one of the galleries, and a heedless cry of fire which followed it, created a panic.” (NYT, 3/8/1877) Seven people were killed in the ensuing chaos. This newspaper clipping from our Picture Collection attempts to illustrate the scene in an era before news photography.

    On March 8, 1877, in the Church of St. Francis Xavier on 16th Street, “the shriek of an hysterical woman in one of the galleries, and a heedless cry of fire which followed it, created a panic.” (NYT, 3/8/1877) Seven people were killed in the ensuing chaos. This newspaper clipping from our Picture Collection attempts to illustrate the scene in an era before news photography.

  5. NY Times Best Books of 2011 →

    We interrupt our regularly scheduled program to bring you the latest news about Karen Russell, 2009 Cullman Center for Scholars and Writers Fellow…

    Karen’s critically acclaimed novel Swamplandia (which can be found at the Library) was just selected as a best book of 2011 by the New York Times! Swamplandia has been making the rounds of late and is in development to become an HBO Comedy project. 

    You can hear Karen discuss the creation of her novel with another immensely talented author, Wells Tower, during her visit to the Library last March at an event hosted by the Cullman Center for Scholars and Writers. (Wells Tower will be appearing at the Library with John Jeremiah Sullivan on December 15 - check that out too!) 

  6. Lil Wayne Better Than Charles Dickens … Sort Of

    In a hilarious post yesterday by The NY Times blog “The 6th Floor,” The New York Public Library was a finalist in a “minimalist, midsummer Sentence Of The Week.” The writer narrowed six nominees to two finalists:

    1 - “The handle of this letter opener is the paw of Charles Dickens’s pet cat Bob.” (The New York Public Library exhibit “Celebrating 100 Years”). (Photo above by NYPL’s Jonathan Blanc)

    2 - “My picture should be in the dictionary next to the definition of definition.” (Lil Wayne)

    The results: “Lil Wayne refreshes a cliché by making it eat itself. Charles Dickens’s cat-paw letter opener is an instant classic among literary factoids — made infinitely better, somehow, by the fact that the cat’s name was Bob. It’s a tough call, but in the end I’m going with cleverness over reportage.”

    The winner - Lil Wayne. Oh well. As they all say, it was an honor just to be nominated.

  7. The New York Times attended our Anti-Prom on Friday night! →