1. For those of you interested in great 1970’s films or the world of television do we have an awesome free event tonight at The New York Public Library for the Performing Arts at 6:00pm in the Bruno Walter Auditorium. The New York Times Culture Reporter Dave Itzkoff stops by to discuss his latest book MAD AS HELL: THE MAKING OF NETWORK AND THE FATEFUL VISION OF THE ANGRIEST MAN IN MOVIES. Dave is no stranger to The Library for the Performing Arts as he researched much of his book by using the Paddy Chayefsky Papers that can be found within The Billy Rose Theatre Division. You can also read an article Dave wrote about the collection for The Times from 2011 here. 

    For those of you interested in great 1970’s films or the world of television do we have an awesome free event tonight at The New York Public Library for the Performing Arts at 6:00pm in the Bruno Walter Auditorium. The New York Times Culture Reporter Dave Itzkoff stops by to discuss his latest book MAD AS HELL: THE MAKING OF NETWORK AND THE FATEFUL VISION OF THE ANGRIEST MAN IN MOVIES. Dave is no stranger to The Library for the Performing Arts as he researched much of his book by using the Paddy Chayefsky Papers that can be found within The Billy Rose Theatre Division. You can also read an article Dave wrote about the collection for The Times from 2011 here

  2. NYPL Archivist Talks About Her (Fascinating) Job With The NY Times  →

    Annemarie van Roessel - an archivist at our Library for the Performing Arts - was featured in today’s New York Times discussing her job and the collections she works with. She is the star of an accompanying video - check it out. 

  3. In case you missed it earlier this week Corey Kilgannon of The New York Times did a wonderful profile of Lloyd Burlingame  a devoted user of The NYPL’s Andrew Heiskell Braille and Talking Book Library. A former Broadway set designer, NYU Professor, painter, and now published author, Lloyd is a modern day renaissance man. Pictured  here with his beloved guide dog Kemp, Lloyd currently has some of his personal artwork on display (known as “touch art”) at the Braille and Talking Book Library. But that is not all, Lloyd is also working with the fascinating Audio Book Studio at the branch so that his recent book TWO SEEING EYE DOGS TAKE MANHATTAN is available to all patrons. 

    In case you missed it earlier this week Corey Kilgannon of The New York Times did a wonderful profile of Lloyd Burlingame  a devoted user of The NYPL’s Andrew Heiskell Braille and Talking Book Library. A former Broadway set designer, NYU Professor, painter, and now published author, Lloyd is a modern day renaissance man. Pictured  here with his beloved guide dog Kemp, Lloyd currently has some of his personal artwork on display (known as “touch art”) at the Braille and Talking Book Library. But that is not all, Lloyd is also working with the fascinating Audio Book Studio at the branch so that his recent book TWO SEEING EYE DOGS TAKE MANHATTAN is available to all patrons. 

  4. The New York Public Library for the Performing Arts concludes the journalism film series ALL THE NEWS FIT TO SCREEN this week with a gem of a program. Director Brian De Palma’s 1990 film adaptation of Tom Wolfe’s classic novel THE BONFIRE OF THE VANITIES is one of the famous misfires in film history. On the set of the troubled production with stunning access was journalist Julie Salamon who documented the experience in her remarkable book THE DEVIL’S CANDY: THE BONFIRE OF THE VANITIES GOES TO HOLLYWOOD. This Thursday Ms. Salamon will join The New York Times Dave Itzkoff in a Q&A at The Library for the Performing Arts following a screening of the film to discuss her experience and book. The program is free and seating is on a first come, first serve basis. Should be a blast! 

    The New York Public Library for the Performing Arts concludes the journalism film series ALL THE NEWS FIT TO SCREEN this week with a gem of a program. Director Brian De Palma’s 1990 film adaptation of Tom Wolfe’s classic novel THE BONFIRE OF THE VANITIES is one of the famous misfires in film history. On the set of the troubled production with stunning access was journalist Julie Salamon who documented the experience in her remarkable book THE DEVIL’S CANDY: THE BONFIRE OF THE VANITIES GOES TO HOLLYWOODThis Thursday Ms. Salamon will join The New York Times Dave Itzkoff in a Q&A at The Library for the Performing Arts following a screening of the film to discuss her experience and book. The program is free and seating is on a first come, first serve basis. Should be a blast! 

  5. Last weekend’s New York Times featured a powerful profile on NYPL patron Leironica Hawkins, who has Asperger’s Syndrome. Currently on display at The New York Public Library’s Grand Central location (located at 135 East 46th Street) is a fascinating art exhibition, Asperger’s Syndrome: An Invisible Disability, created by Leironica. Above is some of the art, all drawn by Leironica, featured in the exhibition.   

  6. Lil Wayne Better Than Charles Dickens … Sort Of

    In a hilarious post yesterday by The NY Times blog “The 6th Floor,” The New York Public Library was a finalist in a “minimalist, midsummer Sentence Of The Week.” The writer narrowed six nominees to two finalists:

    1 - “The handle of this letter opener is the paw of Charles Dickens’s pet cat Bob.” (The New York Public Library exhibit “Celebrating 100 Years”). (Photo above by NYPL’s Jonathan Blanc)

    2 - “My picture should be in the dictionary next to the definition of definition.” (Lil Wayne)

    The results: “Lil Wayne refreshes a cliché by making it eat itself. Charles Dickens’s cat-paw letter opener is an instant classic among literary factoids — made infinitely better, somehow, by the fact that the cat’s name was Bob. It’s a tough call, but in the end I’m going with cleverness over reportage.”

    The winner - Lil Wayne. Oh well. As they all say, it was an honor just to be nominated.

  7. Happy birthday Al Hirschfeld! Above is one of his NY Times caricatures from 1976, depicting Penny Fuller (Anne Boleyn/Princess Elizabeth) and Nicol Williamson (Henry VIII) in “Rex.” That drawing is at our Library For The Performing Arts, along with Hirschfeld’s writing desk and barber chair, donated to NYPL earlier this year.

    Happy birthday Al Hirschfeld! Above is one of his NY Times caricatures from 1976, depicting Penny Fuller (Anne Boleyn/Princess Elizabeth) and Nicol Williamson (Henry VIII) in “Rex.” That drawing is at our Library For The Performing Arts, along with Hirschfeld’s writing desk and barber chair, donated to NYPL earlier this year.

  8. From Hooks To Books: NY Times Profiles A Former Wrestling Ref Who Is Now A NYPL Security Guard →

  9. NY Times Writes About Our Free "Facebook 101" Classes →

  10. Tale Of The Tats At The Library

    What was the first thing Mexican tattoo artist Dr. Lakra did when he got to The Big Apple in preparation for his upcoming show at The Drawing Center? He went straight to The New York Public Library, of course. C’mon, where else would a tattoo artist go? As the NY Times explains, “He began researching some of the subjects that fascinate him, like 19th-century medical instruments, witchcraft and anthropology. ‘When I travel, I always go to public libraries,’ he said in a recent interview. ‘I’m always hungry for images.’” In honor of this very cool story, below is an image of a “Man With A Tattoo” from our Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Division of Art, Prints and Photographs.