1. In the spirit of our love for food and upcomingModern Art Cookbook: Art and Food Series Event, we thought we’d share this berrylicious image of A Carload of Mammoth Strawberries and hope that it inspires you to take part in our NYPL Food Challenge! We are asking our followers to step into their kitchens and have some fun using David Hockney’s Strawberry Cake recipe (as seen above). Be sure to post your final results on your Tumblr page and share them with us here at NYPL by using #NYPLFoodChallenge. We can’t wait to see your strawberry cakes and hope you enjoy!

    Also, join us at the Stephen A. Schwarzman Building on Wednesday, February 26th as author and food historian Andrew F. Smith,poet and cultural critic Wayne Koestenbaum, and author and art historian Mary Ann Caws come together for a conversation centering on the newly published The Modern Art CookbookWe will be giving away a free copy of The Modern Cookbook to the first person that attends our Art & Food Series and asks a question to our guest speakers during the Q&A portion of the event. Be sure to mention our Tumblr post!

  2. Chef Marcus Samuelsson can make just about anything sound delicious - even Thanksgiving leftovers. Check out some of his recipes for giving leftovers a makeover on his blog. And when you’re done drooling over those dishes, grab tickets to see Chef Samuelsson here at LIVE from the NYPL on December 10.

    Chef Marcus Samuelsson can make just about anything sound delicious - even Thanksgiving leftovers. Check out some of his recipes for giving leftovers a makeover on his blog. And when you’re done drooling over those dishes, grab tickets to see Chef Samuelsson here at LIVE from the NYPL on December 10.

  3. One of the fun parts of the Library’s new exhibition, Lunch Hour NYC, which opens tomorrow, is the Automat machine, which has been restored in all its Art-Deco splendor. Visitors are allowed to open up the doors just like the old days, but instead of putting in a nickle and taking out a piece of pie, you open the door and take out a recipe card. The recipes are scaled-down versions of the actual recipes used by the Horn and Hardart company.
One of us made the Automat’s Baked Macaroni and Cheese the other day. Our husband accidentally bought corkscrew noodles instead of elbow, but otherwise we did just as instructed, and it turned out great. Try it for yourself:
Baked Macaroni and Cheese from Horn & Hardart’s Automat
1/4 lb elbow macaroni1 1/2 tbsp butter1 1/2 tbsp flour1/2 tsp saltdash white pepperdash red pepper1 1/2 cups milk2 tbsp light cream1 cup cheddar cheese, shredded1/2 cup canned tomatoes, diced1/2 tsp sugar
Cook macaroni according to directions on the package. Preheat oven to 400 deg.
Melt butter in the top of a double boiler. Blend flour, salt, and white and red pepper in gradually. When smooth, add milk and cream, stirring constantly. Cook for a few minutes until it thickens.
Add cheese and continue to heat until it melts and the sauce looks smooth. Remove from heat. Add cooked macaroni to the sauce. Add sugar to tomatoes and add to the sauce.
Pour mixture into a buttered baking dish and bake until the surface browns. Serves 4. (We must add: serves 4 as a side dish, 2 as a main.)

    One of the fun parts of the Library’s new exhibition, Lunch Hour NYC, which opens tomorrow, is the Automat machine, which has been restored in all its Art-Deco splendor. Visitors are allowed to open up the doors just like the old days, but instead of putting in a nickle and taking out a piece of pie, you open the door and take out a recipe card. The recipes are scaled-down versions of the actual recipes used by the Horn and Hardart company.

    One of us made the Automat’s Baked Macaroni and Cheese the other day. Our husband accidentally bought corkscrew noodles instead of elbow, but otherwise we did just as instructed, and it turned out great. Try it for yourself:

    Baked Macaroni and Cheese from Horn & Hardart’s Automat

    1/4 lb elbow macaroni
    1 1/2 tbsp butter
    1 1/2 tbsp flour
    1/2 tsp salt
    dash white pepper
    dash red pepper
    1 1/2 cups milk
    2 tbsp light cream
    1 cup cheddar cheese, shredded
    1/2 cup canned tomatoes, diced
    1/2 tsp sugar

    Cook macaroni according to directions on the package. Preheat oven to 400 deg.

    Melt butter in the top of a double boiler. Blend flour, salt, and white and red pepper in gradually. When smooth, add milk and cream, stirring constantly. Cook for a few minutes until it thickens.

    Add cheese and continue to heat until it melts and the sauce looks smooth. Remove from heat. Add cooked macaroni to the sauce. Add sugar to tomatoes and add to the sauce.

    Pour mixture into a buttered baking dish and bake until the surface browns. Serves 4. (We must add: serves 4 as a side dish, 2 as a main.)

  4. Flashback Friday takes a page from “What to Drink; The Blue Book of Beverages; Recipes and Directions for Making and Serving Non-Alcoholic Drinks for all Occasions" by Bertha E.L. Stockbridge. But why?
79 years ago today, the Blaine Act was passed by Congress. What was the Blaine Act, you ask? The beginning of the end for the 18th Amendment of the US Constitution or as it was more commonly known - Prohibition. But, that’s no reason to miss out on a delicious drink like the Chocolate Flip!

    Flashback Friday takes a page from “What to Drink; The Blue Book of Beverages; Recipes and Directions for Making and Serving Non-Alcoholic Drinks for all Occasions" by Bertha E.L. Stockbridge. But why?

    79 years ago today, the Blaine Act was passed by Congress. What was the Blaine Act, you ask? The beginning of the end for the 18th Amendment of the US Constitution or as it was more commonly known - Prohibition. But, that’s no reason to miss out on a delicious drink like the Chocolate Flip!

  5. Need a last-minute Thanksgiving veggie recipe that involves lots of bacon and butter? Jean Strouse, head of the prestigious NYPL Cullman Center for Scholars and Writers, has got you covered. Her recipe for shredded Brussels Sprouts (adopted from a 1990 NY Times recipe - she added lots more fat) is so darn good, even the most staunch sprout hater will ask for thirds. The recipe appears in the new book Eating For Beginners by Melanie Rehak, a former Cullman fellow who calls the recipe “the most important thing” she learned from Jean. Check out the video - shot and edited by NYPL filmmaker extraordinaire Elena Parker - to see Jean and Melanie fatten up some sprouts.

    For now, here’s the short version of the recipe:

    1 - Core and remove the hard leaves of about 5 pints of Brussels sprouts. Shred them in a food processor.

    2 - Put about one pound of bacon in a skillet and fry it up, rendering the fat. Remove and drain the bacon and put it aside.

    3 - Toast about a half a pint of pine nuts in the bacon fat.

    4 - Add the shredded sprouts into the pan. Add AT LEAST a stick of butter to keep them moist so they don’t burn. “Shovel everything around.”

    5 - After the sprouts soften, break up the bacon pieces and add them.

    6 - Eat!