1. We hope everyone is having a St. Patrick’s Day! A few images for you today from the Picture Collection’s assortment of vintage holiday cards.

    May the wind be always at your back.

  2. It’s getting close to dinner time, so we thought we’d share this 1962 St. Patrick’s Day menu from our Rare Books Division to whet your appetites (technically it’s a brunch menu, but whatever). For $5.75 a person, diners got a whole lot of green / Irish branded food, including green bean salad, salmon in a green sauce, green pea soup, and “Leprechaun” beer. Most of the food sounds amazing … although the cup of fresh clam broth with whipped cream sounds a bit odd. Love our historic menus? Check out the blog of Menu Collection curator Rebecca Federman, and then check out our What’s On The Menu? project, which allows the public to transcribe info on our menus into a searchable database, helping culinary historians and researchers. So give it a try - just a warning: it’s addictive. 

  3. Top o’ the morning to ya, and Happy St. Patrick’s Day! To mark the occasion, here are just a few samples of historic St. Paddy’s Day cards and photos from the varying collections of The New York Public Library. Want to explore more historic artifacts and images? Browse through our Digital Gallery - there’s something for everyone. Enjoy! 

  4. This weekend is St. Patrick’s Day, and there will be much celebrating in New York City (starting today, with the St. Paddy’s Day Parade, which you can watch online and will march right past our landmark 42nd Street building), so for a festive Caturday, we’re sharing this 1885 image by legendary artist Rudolph Caldecott, which depicts a (very odd) celebration. The image - located in our Mid-Manhattan Picture Collection - features a kind of angry looking cat and the fiddle (as in “hey, diddle, diddle”) and several children happily dancing (including the one in the front, who is either very, very tiny, or a doll that’s sort of alive. It’s unclear). Meanwhile, an adult in the background is serving the food and looking on with an expression of, “Yeah. This is normal and happens all the time.” Gotta love it. Happy Caturday!

    This weekend is St. Patrick’s Day, and there will be much celebrating in New York City (starting today, with the St. Paddy’s Day Parade, which you can watch online and will march right past our landmark 42nd Street building), so for a festive Caturday, we’re sharing this 1885 image by legendary artist Rudolph Caldecott, which depicts a (very odd) celebration. The image - located in our Mid-Manhattan Picture Collection - features a kind of angry looking cat and the fiddle (as in “hey, diddle, diddle”) and several children happily dancing (including the one in the front, who is either very, very tiny, or a doll that’s sort of alive. It’s unclear). Meanwhile, an adult in the background is serving the food and looking on with an expression of, “Yeah. This is normal and happens all the time.” Gotta love it. Happy Caturday!

  5. As our final St. Patrick’s Day postcard post of the day, here is a truly beautiful card from 1932, currently in our Mid-Manhattan Picture Collection. Enjoy!

    As our final St. Patrick’s Day postcard post of the day, here is a truly beautiful card from 1932, currently in our Mid-Manhattan Picture Collection. Enjoy!

  6. The Library wishes you all the good things possible on this day (as does this 1914 card from our Mid-Manhattan Picture Collection). Happy St. Pat’s!

    The Library wishes you all the good things possible on this day (as does this 1914 card from our Mid-Manhattan Picture Collection). Happy St. Pat’s!

  7. OK, it’s the afternoon, but check out this St. Patrick’s Day postcard (which SEEMS to be from 1912, based on the back of the card ) that celebrates “St. Patrick’s Day In The Morning.” The card - which currently sits in our Mid-Manhattan Picture Collection - was originally sent to Willie Donovan on East 95th Street, and the message said, “Top of the morning to you, Willie. St. Patrick told me to send you this. Don’t forget to kiss the Blarney Stone. Your friend, Marnie Maddeu.” Gotta love it. 

    OK, it’s the afternoon, but check out this St. Patrick’s Day postcard (which SEEMS to be from 1912, based on the back of the card ) that celebrates “St. Patrick’s Day In The Morning.” The card - which currently sits in our Mid-Manhattan Picture Collection - was originally sent to Willie Donovan on East 95th Street, and the message said, “Top of the morning to you, Willie. St. Patrick told me to send you this. Don’t forget to kiss the Blarney Stone. Your friend, Marnie Maddeu.” Gotta love it. 

  8. A happy St. Paddy’s Day to you all. This postcard was sent from “Burns” in Missouri to Teresa Brianzi at the NYPL on March 17, 1932. The return stamp says “SAINT PATRICK”! Awesome.

  9. This 1927 book jacket from the Library’s General Research Division shows cute cats  crossing the road and marching in their own personal parade through the streets of New York City - much like today’s St. Patrick’s Day Parade (which you can watch live here). Happy St. Patrick’s Day and happy Caturday!! We’ll be posting some of our historic St. Patrick’s Day cards today, so stay tuned!

    This 1927 book jacket from the Library’s General Research Division shows cute cats  crossing the road and marching in their own personal parade through the streets of New York City - much like today’s St. Patrick’s Day Parade (which you can watch live here). Happy St. Patrick’s Day and happy Caturday!! We’ll be posting some of our historic St. Patrick’s Day cards today, so stay tuned!

  10. The 2011 St. Patrick’s Day Parade down Fifth Avenue is New York City is starting any second now. You can watch it live here. You can also look at historic photos of the parade on our Digital Gallery. The photo above (featuring St. Patrick’s Cathedral) is from 1942 and in our Irma and Paul Milstein Division of United States History, Local History and Genealogy.

    The 2011 St. Patrick’s Day Parade down Fifth Avenue is New York City is starting any second now. You can watch it live here. You can also look at historic photos of the parade on our Digital Gallery. The photo above (featuring St. Patrick’s Cathedral) is from 1942 and in our Irma and Paul Milstein Division of United States History, Local History and Genealogy.